Bugout! California Part 138 – The Battle of Portland

A huge crowd ringed the Swan Island Basin in Portland, Oregon, many with signs, most wearing all black with masks covering their faces below the eyes. Behind them were several hundred Portland PD officers, in riot gear, attempting to stay between them and a growing number of counter-protesters.

Nathan watched the water nervously as the big EU Navy ship cruised slowly towards the dock. He turned every few seconds to watch the counter-protesters, holding signs that said NO UN along with American flags. He was only twenty-five, medium build, tattoos covering his upper arms and neck, large round earrings stretching his lobes.

“Hey, Sean,” he said quietly. “This makes me nervous. There’s only one way out of here, and that’s more counter protesters than I’ve ever seen before. Why is the Portland PD letting them get so close?”

Sean’s eyes turned his direction, his cheeks rising under his black bandana, eyes smaller as he laughed. “Rednecks and retired people. I’m gonna break some heads as soon as the UN Peacekeepers show themselves.” He was smaller than Nathan, holding a long stick with finishing nails sticking out a few inches on either end, his medium-length blonde hair shining in the sun.

“I’m hearing bad rumors,” Nathan said, looking back at the ship as it slowly moved towards the dock, a crew there now to grab the ropes. A UN flag rose on the flagpole over the bridge, and a cheer went up from a few thousand black-clad people.

“Watch those Nazis crap themselves when the UN Peacekeepers come down the planks,” Sean said.

“The reactionaries outnumber the police now,” Nathan said. “At least two to one, and they’re still showing up.”

“And we’ve got sixty thousand UN Peacekeepers getting off that boat,” Sean said. “You worry too much. As soon as we get rough with those right-wingers, they’ll turn tail and run… and even if they don’t we’ll be protected by the police as usual.”

“The public is starting to see through this, you know.”

“So go home, little boy,” Sean said.

“Hey, we’d better get out of here!” cried a woman in black with a mask, her stringy brown hair hanging around her shoulders. “Look at this.”

“Shut up, Emily,” Sean shouted.

“What do you see?” Nathan asked, rushing over. She held her phone in front of him. It was news-chopper video of the area. There was a vast multitude of people heading in on all streets, crossing North Willamette Boulevard. “My God. How many people is that?”

“Let me see it,” Sean said, rushing over and looking. He laughed. “You guys are assuming that they’re not on our side.” Emily and Nathan looked at him like he was crazy.

“We know the community,” Emily said. “If there was this many people coming, we’d have known about it days ago.”

“Well run along home, then,” Sean said, turning back to the ship. It was tied to the dock now, and the gang plank was being rolled up.

“Oh, God,” Emily said, looking at her phone again. “Is that another warship. See it? Just getting to Kelley Point Park.”

“There’s more than one ship in the EU Navy, you idiot,” Sean said, looking over at the counter demonstrators again. Several black-clad thugs were rushing past the police line, attacking counter protestors as the police stood by and watched. Suddenly the number of counter demonstrators increased and the police loudspeaker warned all the protestors to go back to their sides. Sean ran towards them as Nathan and Emily watched.

“Moron,” Emily said. “Want to go? No paycheck is worth this.”

“Dressed like this, we’ll never make it past Willamette,” he said. “C’mon, let’s jump the box factory fence and get on one of the semi-trailers in the yard. We can watch from there, then slip out in the confusion.”

“Okay,” she said. They pushed their way towards the fence as most of the black-clad thugs headed to the counter-demonstrator lines. The police began to fire tear gas at the growing crowd of citizens, ignoring the thugs who raced in and attacked them.

Nathan climbed the fence, turning when he was on the far side to help Emily up. They both hit the pavement of the box factory lot and raced towards the row of semi-trailers parked at the loading docks.

“There’s one we can get on,” Nathan said, racing towards it, Emily struggling to keep up. He leapt onto a dumpster next to one of them, and jumped, getting a good hand hold and pulling himself up on top. “C’mon, I’ll grab you.”

Emily looked at him, scared to death, frozen in place.

“Now, dammit!” Nathan shouted.

She snapped out of it and ran, jumping onto the dumpster, taking Nathan’s hand. He pulled her up, and they both stood.

“Holy crap,” Emily said, watching the hand-to-hand fighting between the black-clad people, citizens wearing casual clothes, and police, who were firing bean bags at the counter protestors now.

“Look, UN Peacekeepers!” Nathan said, pointing. “They’re coming down the gang plank in a hurry! That’ll show the reactionaries.”

Emily turned to Nathan, horrified. “They’re lining the deck with their guns out.”

“Show of force,” Nathan said. “Good. That battle is getting out of hand.”

“Our people are getting the crap beat out of them,” Emily said, watching as more and more citizens rushed in, trampling the protesters, kicking them and punching them as they tried to fight back with their clubs, sticks, pepper spray, and bags of urine.

“Look, the police are running away,” Nathan said. “Dammit. What are they doing? There’s still too many counter-protesters here!”

“Damn Mayor’s office,” Emily said. “This is complete lack of coordination.”

Suddenly gunfire erupted from the deck of the ship, UN Peacekeepers firing into the fighting crowd, hitting both sides of the battle.

“No!” Emily shouted, watching people hitting the ground. Then there were screams and yells as the area flooded with thousands of armed citizens, taking aim with their rifles and firing at the ship, killing several of the Peacekeepers as the rest dropped behind cover in shocked horror. Automatic fire started up from several groups of citizens, bullets hitting the gang plank, knocking down the Peacekeepers who were trapped there.

“Those are military weapons!” shouted Nathan. “I see M60s and M-16s! Where’d they get those?”

“You know how those white nationalists are,” Emily said, tears running down her cheeks.

“They can’t own those,” Nathan said. “Somebody gave those guns to them for this event.”

“Those sailors are uncovering the weapons on the boat,” Emily said, her eyes wide as they opened fire on the crowd, strafing with machine gun fire. One of the citizens with an M60 fired back, hitting the men behind one gun, another gunner hitting the man. Several more citizens with M60s rushed up, firing from behind cover now. The UN Peacekeepers were back, firing, hitting citizens, but also taking fire from every direction around the dock, many of them hit.

“This is horrible,” Nathan said.

“Here comes that other boat,” Emily said. “Crap, that’s a US Navy ship!”

Just as the words left her lips, several missiles were fired, all of them hitting the EU ship, blowing the top half of the ship into pieces, silencing the machine gun fire. A cheer rang out from the multitude, sounding like a huge roar.

“We’d better get out of here,” Emily said.

“Take off that outfit,” Nathan said, taking off his black shirt.

“I can’t, I don’t have anything on underneath,” she said.

“Look, there’s more of them,” shouted an old man holding an M-16, leading a group of citizens into the box factory lot. Those were the last words Emily and Nathan heard.

***

Daan looked out his apartment window, down at a quiet night in Brussels. He had more work to do. The UN refused to continue pumping men and materiel to the states without additional funding, and the EU leadership refused to do anything. His cellphone rang. It was the UN Secretary General. He let it go to voicemail, then walked to his bar and poured himself some whiskey. Leverage. He needed leverage. His phone rang again. Dammit. He looked. Saladin. His heart started to pound.

“Hello,” he said as he sat on his couch.

“Still in Brussels?” Saladin asked.

“Yeah, but I’ll be coming back soon.”

“Have you seen the news, or talked to any of the team?” Saladin asked.

“Oh, crap, what happened now?”

“We had a really bad day on several fronts,” Saladin said.

“Can’t be much worse than what’s happened here,” Daan said. He drank down his whiskey and got up to get another, leaning against his bar. “Let’s have it.”

“We sent a team to take out the CHP headquarters in Sacramento. They were defeated.”

“Dammit. By whom?”

“Ivan’s people in their blasted motor homes and off-roaders, and about sixty CHP officers. Somebody armed them with military weapons. They knew we were coming. Like I suspected, they broke your RFID chips.”

“That remains to be seen. They had to expect we’d try to hit the CHP before they could get rolling. All the leadership was there, and it’s a state-wide organization.”

Saladin chuckled. “So why did you okay that operation, then?”

“Hey, it was your idea, remember?”

Saladin was silent for a moment, his breath quickening on the mouthpiece.

“Sorry,” Daan said. “Don’t get pissed. We both thought it was a good idea.”

“Fine,” Saladin said, icy tone to his voice. “There’s more.”

“All right,” Daan said.

“This one should be all over the news, even there, so I’ll tell you the gist, and you can see the details yourself.”

“Go ahead,” he said.

“The EU ship bringing UN Peacekeepers to Portland was destroyed by a US Navy Aegis Cruiser. All our assets were killed, including the Peacekeepers, the sailors on the vessel, and many of our domestic operatives. Oh, and most of our people in the city leadership were rounded up and shot as well.”

Daan felt faint, gripping the bar. He moved to one of the bar stools and sat, leaning his head in his hands.

“You still there?” Saladin asked.

“Yeah,” he said, pouring another drink. “That means we can write off that state.”

“I agree,” Saladin said. “There was also action in Bend and several other of the inland cities. We lost in each location.”

“How?”

“Ivan’s social media operation started it,” he said.

“Ben Dover,” Daan said. “We need to kill him. Make it a priority.”

“He’s in the middle of territory we no longer control. We’ve lost the top third of the state.”

“Dammit, we also lost LA and Orange Counties. What do we still control?”

“We don’t control any of California,” he said.

“You mean we should leave the state? Is there anywhere that the locals don’t control?”

“They don’t have control of the area from Merced south to about I-15. We still operate there, but it would be an exaggeration to say we controlled it.”

“Crap, there’s nothing there,” Daan said.

“Yes, there is. Much of their best agriculture is there, also their oil fields.”

“Yeah, whatever,” he said.

“The agriculture is more important than you think,” Saladin said. “Remember that the lines of trade aren’t in place now.”

“Except for that little body of water called the Pacific Ocean,” Daan said.

“The EU Navy is still strong off the coast.”

“And yet we allowed a US Navy ship to cruise right in and destroy one of their boats,” Daan said. “The parts of Southern California other than LA and Orange Counties are still in contention, are they not?”

“We are still active and powerful enough in those areas to keep working, but we must get that southern route opened back up. I-8 and the others. Everything depends on it.”

“On that we agree,” Daan said. “Is your caravan still proceeding south?”

“Yes, but I have them well spaced out, so they attract as little attention as possible. We’re still hitting at Ivan’s people down there. They think they have a safe place, but we attacked them there a few days ago. If we can force them to get on the move again, we’ll start to pick them off.”

“Those forces that caused us so much problems up north are still around,” Daan said. “What if they come south too?”

“Then we should try to slip people north to take it back over,” Daan said. “I could bring a lot of people in through Nevada.”

“Won’t that hurt your campaign against General Hogan?”

“Temporarily,” Saladin said, “but I no longer consider that as important as I did before.”

“Why not?”

“Like I was saying, they cracked your RFID chips. That makes Frank Johnson a less important target than before.”

“I still want him,” Daan said. “I’ll roast him alive, but I’m not ready to accept that he’s broken the RFID encryption. If he’s done that, we’d lose all our assets in Washington DC. You know that, right? If those people are safe, we can assume that the RFID encryption is still protecting us.”

“Is it possible that they only broke part of the system?” Saladin asked.

“What do you mean?”

“Is it possible they can track location but not have access to the data payload?” Saladin asked.

“Oh. Possible but unlikely. The encryption of the device is just as rigorous as the encryption of the data payload.”

“You don’t sound convinced by your own statement,” Saladin said.

“It’s been a long day, and it’s not over yet. Now I know why the UN Secretary General just tried to call me.”

“He tried to call you? Just now? I didn’t hear any beeps.”

“No, before you called,” Daan said. “I didn’t want to talk to him. Now I don’t have a choice.”

“What happened back there?”

“The UN leadership dug in their heels on increased funding to stay in the fight, and the EU leadership refused to cough up more money.”

Saladin laughed. “So, go work it harder. You know how that goes.”

“After what just happened, my job is even harder than before.”

“Mine too, my friend, but we have to roll with the punches,” Saladin said.

“All right,” Daan said. “Anything else?”

“Fortunately, no,” Saladin said. “Talk to you soon.” He ended the call. Daan grabbed the bottle of whiskey and his glass, and headed for the couch. He hit the Secretary General’s contact.

***

Seth and Kaitlyn sat at a table against the wall in the Dodge City Saloon. Most of their friends were up at the bar, having a drink and chatting.

“Go ahead,” Kaitlyn said.

“What?”

“You brought the laptop for a reason. Plug it in and get it warmed up. Then you can monitor your new program while we’re here.”

“Okay,” he said. “You can go hang with Megan and the others while I check, and I’ll be along.”

“I’m with the person I want to be with right now,” she said, putting her hand on his arm. “Trust me. I’m interested in what your program is showing too, so fire it up. I’ll go get you a beer if you want.”

“Sure, that’d be great, as long as I just have one.”

“Nobody’s drinking a lot,” Kaitlyn said as she slid out of her seat. “Be right back.”

Seth put his laptop on the table and set it up, plugging it into a wall outlet next to him. After it was running, he took out his phone and activated the personal hot spot. The laptop connected, and Seth navigated to his server, hitting the report download button. Excel started, and his report populated after a couple minutes. Kaitlyn came back, holding two beers. He took his and had a sip.

“Not bad,” he said.

“Yeah, I was pleasantly surprised,” Kaitlyn said, sitting back down. “Is it still working?”

“Yep,” he said. “I downloaded a report into Excel. You could probably help with this part.”

“Let’s see,” she said, watching as he turned the laptop to face her. She studied it for a few minutes. “I see what you’re doing here. I couldn’t have done much better, honestly. Maybe I could automate it.”

“You see any quadrants where we’ve had RFID chips disappear?”

She studied it again for a moment, eyes furrowed, until she found the right column and understood what it was saying. “Yes, I do see something funny.”

“Crap, really?” Seth asked, getting up and looking over her shoulder.

“Is that what this means?” she asked, moving the cursor over a column.

“I set it up so at least four had to disappear without them being someplace else.”

“What if they just left?”

“It’s looking at a hundred square miles,” Seth said. “Unless they were right on the border of that, they couldn’t move out of range fast enough. He took a closer look. “This one is okay. The text would show up red if the rules applied. These folks were close to the border.”

“Can you move it to make sure?”

“Yeah, but I’ll have to run the report again.”

“Do it,” she said. “I’m interested.”

He nodded. “I’ll show you how, in case we need it run and I’m not around.” He walked her through the procedure, and they ran the report, moved over to pick up the area nearest to where the missing hits were.

“That’s them, isn’t it?” she asked.

“Looks like it.”

“We don’t have a problem, then?”

“Not yet,” Seth said.

“Why don’t you look at a larger area?”

“It’s harder to analyze,” Seth said.

“You see, that’s where I can help,” she said. “Let me mess with the reporting for a while. Can you set this to run for, say, a thousand square miles?”

“Sure, but it’ll take a while to run.”

“Dammit, I was due at the cinema in ten minutes,” she said.

Seth laughed, and she shot him a smirk. “Let me help you, okay?”

“Okay,” Seth said. “You know how to set the scope – go ahead and adjust the settings and run it again.”

“We won’t have history for all of it, though, will we?”

“Nope, but we’ll run it that way and start gathering the history,” Seth said. “Mind if I watch you? I could use better knowledge of Excel.”

“Be my guest,” she said. He pulled up a chair next to her and watched as she worked.

 

To be continued…

 

Bug Out! California Book 1 is now available in the Kindle Store, free in Kindle Unlimited!

 

The Plan – How the Bugout! War Started is now available in the Kindle Store, free in Kindle Unlimited!

 

Bug Out! Texas Book 1 is now just 99 cents in the Kindle Store! Free in Kindle Unlimited! This is the story of Texas Patriots and their struggle against enemies, foreign and domestic, during the Bug Out! War. Chock full of action, adventure, suspense, and romance. Pick up your copy of Bug Out! Texas Book 1 today!

 

Please visit and like my author page on Facebook!

 

Here’s the series that started it all! Bug Out! Pick up your copy of book 1 for just 99 cents in the Kindle Store!

 

Horror Road – A Supernatural Thriller! Available now in the Kindle Store – Book 1 is just 99 cents for a limited time!

 

The first of my full length novels has been published in the Amazon Kindle store, available now. For those of you have have been readying the Bugout! series, the story involves George and Malcolm, and is set about seven years earlier. This book R rated, instead of the PG-13 of the Bugout! Series, so be warned. Here’s the link to “Never A Loose End”

 

To be continued…

 

Copyright Robert Boren 2017

Advertisements

Bugout! California Part 137 – The Patriots of Bend

Tex was leading the small force to the apartment building across the street from the CHP headquarters in Sacramento. Jules, Ted, and Sparky followed, along with CHP Officers Teter and Goldberg. The building was pockmarked with bullets, a few residents coming out, more driving in to survey the damage, having left when the gunfire started.

“Who’s gonna clean this up?” Sparky asked. Tex shot him a smirk as they neared the door to the lobby.

“Where bodies?” Jules asked.

“Penthouse floor,” Goldberg said. “Middle of the building. Room 405.”

“Is it over?” asked an old woman, who was standing in the sidewalk with a cart full of belongings.

“Yes, but we’re going to check for any enemy fighters who might still be alive,” Officer Teter said. “Please stay out here until we’ve given the all clear.”

“Yes sir,” she said. “Thank you.”

The group went into the front door. “Want to check out their apartment first?” Goldberg asked.

“Might as well,” Ted said. “Stairs.”

“Yeah,” Sparky said. Teter lead them to the stairwell and they raced up, winded at the top.

“I need to be in better shape,” Jules said, huffing and puffing.

“You and me both, boss,” Sparky said.

They followed Teter down the walkway to the room, the door hanging open. “Watch yourselves. We killed these guys as the battle was raging. I’m assuming we got them all, but you never know.”

Jules nodded, and the group went into the building in two-by-two formation, aiming their M4s as they searched, getting to the living room which opened onto a balcony facing the CHP building. The bodies were there, lifeless, staring into space.

Tex and Sparky rushed over, kneeling next to them, checking their pockets.

“What are you guys looking for?” Goldberg asked.

“Car keys,” Tex said. “Bingo.” He stood up, key fob in his hand. Sparky was checking the last one.

“Nothing in the rest,” Sparky said. “Looks like that UN Peacekeeper was the driver.”

“What kind of key is that?” Goldberg asked.

“Mercedes,” Tex said, tossing the key fob to him.

“UN van,” Jules said. “Wonder if marked?”

“I suspect we’ll find out in a minute,” Ted said. “Let’s go to the parking garage.”

“Wonder where the residents of this apartment are?” Sparky asked. “Look at the décor. This was an old person, or maybe an old couple.”

“You’re right,” Goldberg said. “Looks like my grandma’s place.”

“You check the closets for bodies?” Tex asked.

“We checked them for hiding enemy fighters,” Teter said. “Would’ve seen bodies. Nada.”

“Okay, let’s go,” Ted said. The men left the building, Tex going slowly, falling behind as he looked at the floor of the walkway.

“C’mon, Tex, while we’re young,” Ted said.

“Hold it,” Tex said, looking at a small smudge of blood that turned into a thin trail, going into the next unit.

“What?” Jules asked, looking at the floor he was staring at. “Uh oh.”

“Yeah, uh oh,” Tex said, walking towards the door as the others gathered around. He stood to the side of it and knocked hard. No answer.

Teter and Goldberg glanced at each other, then approached, not standing in front of the door, but off to the side as Tex was doing. Goldberg pounded on the door.

“Highway Patrol,” he shouted. “Open up!”

Silence.

“Let’s kick it in,” Tex said.

Goldberg nodded. “Yeah, I think you’re right.”

“I’ve got it,” Teter said, his massive leg kicking the door, breaking it open with the first try. The men got back into formation and went inside, aiming their rifles as they went.

“Oh, God,” Teter said, lowering his weapon. The living room floor was covered with bodies – a mixture of elderly, middle aged, and children, all with their throats cut.

“They must’ve killed everybody on this floor,” Sparky said, turning away from the carnage.

“Well, this side of the building, anyway,” Goldberg said. “Those sick bastards.”

“Time for us to take out the trash,” Teter said, fire in his eyes. “Can’t wait to kill more of these thugs.”

“Let’s check garage,” Jules said. “Afterwards send CHP officers to search entire building. This might not be only dead people.”

Goldberg nodded in agreement, and the men went to the stairwell, taking it all the way down to the underground garage.

“We’d better be careful when we go in here,” Sparky said.

“Yeah, back into formation, guys,” Ted said.

The men got their guns to their shoulders, and Teter opened the door, holding it as the others hurried through. He followed them. Goldberg took out the key fob and pushed the unlock button. There was a click, and headlights went on, around the corner from where they were.

“Over there,” Tex said. They rushed around the corner, staying in formation, their footsteps echoing in the cavernous garage.

“There,” Sparky said. “UN van without the insignia.”

“Just what I expect,” Jules said. The men trotted to it, guns still up.

Teter led the way, getting next to the side sliding door. “Get ready.” He grabbed the door handle and opened it. Everybody’s short range app went off, and a gunshot sounded. Jules opened fire, killing the lone Islamist before he could hit anybody.

“Son of a bitch, look at the inside of this sucker,” Tex said, sticking his head in. “Lead, lining the entire inside.”

“So, UN creeps drive, others in shielded back compartment,” Jules said. “This bad development, no?”

“How many could they have?” Ted asked. “Lead in this amount is hard to come by, and they could only shoehorn about eight fighters in here, max. They’d need hundreds of semi-trailers like this to field a usable force.”

“I call Ivan,” Jules said. “We might not be only team that see this.”

“Yeah, partner, you do that,” Tex said.

***

Jonathan was driving his battered pickup truck east on Oregon Boulevard, the traffic sparse for a late afternoon. Courtney was in the passenger seat, looking at her phone. She looked up.

“Why are we going this way? We hitting Jared’s place?”

Jonathan glanced at her, worry on his face. “I want to make sure he’s leaving. He didn’t answer my last text.”

“Maybe we better split. They might be looking for us right now.”

“They might,” Jonathan said. “Wish we had one of the long guns up here.”

“They’ll throw us in jail if they catch us with a gun up here.”

“They’ll throw us in jail if they catch us, period,” Jonathan said, “once we get out of Bend, anyway.”

“You don’t think the local cops would bust us?”

“No,” Jonathan said. “I know all of them. They’re on our side. They know what’s happening with the EU ship full of UN Peacekeepers. I think some of them will join us.”

They rounded the bend, getting onto Hawthorne Avenue.

“Look, roadblock, just past Hill Street,” Courtney said.

“Oregon State Police,” Jonathan said. “Dammit.”

“They’re not on our side?”

“Nope,” Jonathan said, slowing to a stop and parking on the curb, half a block from Hill Street.

“They’re gonna see us,” Courtney said, getting lower in her seat.

“No they aren’t. They’re all watching Jared’s house. They’ve got assault rifles out.”

“We need to go,” Courtney said.

“In a minute,” Jonathan said, pulling his phone out. He sent a text.

“What are you doing?”

“I’m letting Officer Peterson know that there’s three State Police cars at Jared’s house,” Jonathan said. His phone dinged with a reply.

“Well?”

“They’re already on the way,” Jonathan said, “with most of the force.”

Courtney looked shocked. “They’re going to fight the State Police?”

“They don’t want to be replaced by the UN,” Jonathan said. “They understand what’s going on.”

Suddenly four Bend Police cruisers raced by them, crashing through the barricades, as several more raced up the street from the other direction. Armed officers leapt out of their vehicles.

“Oh, crap,” Cortney said. Jonathan watched, his heart racing. “This is gonna be bad.”

One of the State Police officers came out with a bull horn. “Stop right there. This is out of your jurisdiction.”

“Stand down now!” yelled one of the Bend Police officers.

“We aren’t going to tell you again,” the man with the bull horn said. “We’re here under the authority of the Governor of Oregon.”

“Screw you,” the police officer shouted back. “We won’t allow the UN to come in here. No way in hell. Stand down or be fired upon.”

Several State Police officers pointed their guns at the Bend Police, all of whom pulled their weapons.

“Hold your fire,” the State Police officer said.

“Stand down immediately,” the Bend Officer shouted again.

Suddenly one of the State Police officers fired, hitting the Bend Officer. The first State officer dropped his bullhorn and looked at the dead man in terror, then turned to yell at the officer who fired. It was too late. Gunfire erupted from the Bend police, all the State Police officers in sight dropping, most of them dead.

“Son of a bitch,” Jonathan shouted.

“No!” Courtney said. They watched as Bend officers rushed into the duplex. Gunfire could be heard from inside, then silence.

“Geez,” Jonathan said. He watched as the Bend officers came out the front door, followed by Jared and several of his friends.

“Well, they’re still alive,” Courtney said. “They’re rounding up the State Police officers that are still alive.”

Jonathan sent another text. They could see an officer pull his phone and look at it. He turned towards their truck and motioned them over.

“C’mon,” Jonathan said, opening his door.

“You sure? What if more state cops show up?”

“There’s enough of our guys here to blast them,” he said, going to the truck bed. He opened the camper shell and grabbed his Mini-14.

“What are you doing?” Courtney asked.

“Officer Jenkins said to bring it.”

“Why, so they could take it away from you?” Courtney asked.

“Don’t worry about it,” Jonathan said. “C’mon.”

The two trotted over to the group of officers.

“Hey, Jonathan,” said Officer Jenkins, a man no older than him. “Thanks for giving us the heads up.”

“No problem,” Jonathan said. “Jared!”

Jared looked over and smiled, his right eye blackened, scrapes on his cheeks. “Hey, dude.”

“What happened to you?” Courtney asked, staring at his battered face.

“The Oregon State Gestapo,” Jared said, shrugging. “I didn’t get out fast enough.”

The radio in Jenkin’s car blipped. He rushed over and got it, then came back just as quickly. “They’re at your place now. You can’t go back there.”

“That means they’ll be here any minute,” Courtney said.

“You guys going with us to Portland?” Jared asked.

“We were,” Jenkins said. “Now we’re gonna set up roadblocks to keep the State Police away. We could use volunteers. Want to be deputized? I think a hundred thousand patriots in Portland is enough.”

“Deputize us?” Jared asked. “What is this, the old west?”

Jenkins laughed. “We can still do it…and this is at least the Wild West now. Gonna get worse before it gets better.”

“Wait a minute,” said an older man with a lieutenant’s uniform on, walking over. “You sure these guys are okay?”

“I’ll vouch for them, sir,” Jenkins said. “Known them all my life.”

“I was kinda looking forward to taking on the UN and the EU Navy,” Jared said.

The lieutenant studied him for a moment, then shook his head, shooting a side-long glance at Jenkins. “You’re sure?”

“Yes sir,” Jenkins said. “I know others too. In my gun club, for instance.”

“Okay, go ahead and recruit them,” he said, turning to Jared. “Look, son, there’s a difference to be made here. I suspect if you tried to go to Portland, you’d be shot on the way in.”

“We can’t let the UN Peacekeepers get a foothold,” Jared said.

“And they won’t,” the Lieutenant said. “My brother and sister are both in Portland. There’s more people getting involved than you know. It’s more like two hundred thousand now, and most of the city officials who put martial law in place have gone into hiding. All they have left now is the State Police, and not all of them are towing the line. We’re gonna take this state back, but we need to protect our family and our home. You’re here now and can make a difference. Stay and help us.”

“You guys can work recruitment for us,” Jenkins said. “You’ve proven yourselves to be pretty good at that, you know.”

The lieutenant nodded in agreement. One of the other officers rushed over and whispered in his ear. He picked up the bull horn from next to the dead State Police officer and put it to his lips. “Find some cover and get ready. State Police and some of their friends are on their way here right now.”

“Friends?” Jonathan asked. The lieutenant ignored the question and rushed off to attend to some others.

“C’mon,” Jenkins said. “They’ll head in here on Bend Parkway again.”

“I’d be ready for them to show up from any direction,” Jared said. “Gotta go get my weapon.” He ran off to the rear of his building.

“What should I do?” Courtney asked.

“Get in the basement of Jared’s duplex,” Jonathan said.

“No way, I’m gonna fight,” she said, “so get used to that. I saw what those women said on the video.”

“This is why I love you,” Jonathan said.

Her eyes grew wide. “You love me? You’ve never said that before. Hell, I’ve never said that before.”

He smiled, pulling her in for a kiss, then pulling back and looking at her. “I’m not the greatest communicator. You know that. Let’s go to the truck. You can use the 20-gauge pump. I’ve got about four boxes of shells for that sucker, and it doesn’t kick too hard.”

“I’ve shot it before, remember?”

“Yeah, you were better than me at the skeet range, as I remember,” Jonathan said, taking her by the hand and running to the truck. They grabbed the shotgun and shells, and more ammo for the mini-14. When they got back, Jared was there with a couple more friends, all of them holding M4 variants. They took up positions along the end of Hawthorne Street where it met Hill street, but there weren’t enough good spots.

“Hey, how about those box cars over there?” Jonathan asked, pointing at them on the tracks across Hill Street.

“Perfect, but make sure you don’t get seen from the back side,” Jenkins said.

Jonathan, Courtney, Jared, and several others rushed over there, getting behind the cars and underneath them, guns aimed up and down the street. State Police squad cars and white vans came into view.

“Look, that’s about twenty vehicles,” Jared said. “What’s with the vans? Never seen them before.”

“Look at the sides,” Courtney said, squinting to read. “Says UN in blue letters.”

“Crap, they’re in Bend already?” Jonathan asked.

“They must’ve been infiltrating us for a while,” Jared said. “Here they come. Lock and load.”

“Don’t try to hit them with the shotgun until they’re real close,” Jonathan said. “Better yet, save it for when they get out of their vehicles and start running.”

“I know,” Courtney said, as she fed shells into the gun’s loading gate.

Gunfire erupted from the other side of the street, hitting the first of the State Police cruisers, stopping them in their tracks. The other vehicles stopped in a panic, trying to get out as a hail of lead came at them.

“Get those vans!” Jonathan shouted. “It’s the UN!”

Now everybody was firing, the fronts of all the vehicles getting hit. The side doors of the UN vans opened, men running out towards them. Courtney smiled at Jonathan, then turned and started firing, hitting running men one after another until they figured out they’d better take cover.

“C’mon, let’s go towards them from behind the box cars,” Jared said. “Maybe we can get behind them.”

“Good idea,” Jonathan said. They ran behind the boxcars in a crouch, getting all the way to Irving Avenue.

“This is good,” Jared whispered. “See them over there?”

The three got down on their bellies and opened fire, the UN Peacekeepers and State Police officers looking for cover in a panic, not even trying to return fire. Courtney fired her shotgun with deadly accuracy, dropping several more. The remaining UN Peacekeepers bolted and ran, Jonathan and Jared picking them off before they got twenty yards.”

“I think it’s over,” Jonathan whispered, eyes scanning the area. Courtney was doing the same, taking a moment to top up her magazine with shells. Jenkins and several other Bend officers were coming down the street now, rushing from one bit of cover to the next, checking the vehicles.

“Is it all clear?” Jared shouted.

“Stay under cover,” one of the officers yelled as he moved forward. A shot rang out, and he dived behind a car, the fire returned from all the cops in the street along with Jonathan and the others by the tracks. Courtney saw several men get up to run, so she bolted forward, firing her shotgun as she ran, dropping several more, Jonathan after her, looking in all directions for more enemy fighters. There was silence for a few moments. Courtney got out of the crouch she was in and walked back towards Jonathan, a smile on her face. Then another shot rang out, and her expression changed. She crumpled to the street. Jonathan saw the UN Peacekeeper who shot her and fired, hitting him square in the chest, then rushing over to Courtney.

Her eyes were still open, a faint smile coming over her face as she saw him above her. “I got a little of our own back,” she said softly. “I nailed seven of them.”

“Don’t talk,” Jonathan said, his tears dropping onto her face as he watched her.

“I love you too,” Courtney whispered. Her body spasmed, and she exhaled, dying as he watched.

“Oh, no!” Jonathan cried, kissing her forehead, cradling her body as his friends looked on.

 

Bug Out! California Book 1 is now available in the Kindle Store, free in Kindle Unlimited!

 

The Plan – How the Bugout! War Started is now available in the Kindle Store, free in Kindle Unlimited!

 

Bug Out! Texas Book 1 is now just 99 cents in the Kindle Store! Free in Kindle Unlimited! This is the story of Texas Patriots and their struggle against enemies, foreign and domestic, during the Bug Out! War. Chock full of action, adventure, suspense, and romance. Pick up your copy of Bug Out! Texas Book 1 today!

 

Please visit and like my author page on Facebook!

 

Here’s the series that started it all! Bug Out! Pick up your copy of book 1 for just 99 cents in the Kindle Store!

 

Horror Road – A Supernatural Thriller! Available now in the Kindle Store – Book 1 is just 99 cents for a limited time!

 

The first of my full length novels has been published in the Amazon Kindle store, available now. For those of you have have been readying the Bugout! series, the story involves George and Malcolm, and is set about seven years earlier. This book R rated, instead of the PG-13 of the Bugout! Series, so be warned. Here’s the link to “Never A Loose End”

 

To be continued…

 

Copyright Robert Boren 2017

Bugout! California Part 136 – Roads and Passes

The battle near the CHP Headquarters in Sacramento continued to rage.

In the battle wagon, Robbie looked at Morgan, who’d just said that her rear machine guns displayed an overheat warning. “Hold off on the rear guns for a moment, then. I’ll watch with the mini-gun, you keep an eye across the river and use the front machine guns.”

There was still a high volume of fire coming from the CHP building, but it was almost all M60 fire, judging by how rapid the rate was. That tapered off after a couple of minutes. Robbie didn’t see any more enemy trucks coming at them from Tenth Street, and the north bank of the American River was covered with cruising off-roaders.

“I think we won,” Morgan said.

“Yeah,” Robbie said, scanning with his gun sight. “No movement.”

“Checking the apps,” Morgan said, looking at her phone. “Lots of hits. Can’t tell if their alive or dead.”

“What about the road in. Any more coming?”

“There’s three truck loads heading northeast as fast as they can go,” she said, looking over at him.

“Maybe we should chase them,” Robbie said.

“We should send a message to Ben Dover’s site,” Morgan said. “Warn people they’re coming. Maybe they can take them out.”

“Oh, you’ve been on that site, huh?”

“Yeah,” Morgan said.

“The enemy can monitor that too, you know.”

“There are private encrypted messages you can use,” Morgan said. “Just came on line this morning. You should check it out.”

“I will,” he said as she typed on her phone.

“Sent a message to Jules about that. Suggested that we send messages to Auburn and other towns along I-80.”

Robbie laughed. “He’ll ask you to do it.”

“I’m good with that.” Her phone dinged with a reply. She read it and laughed.

“I knew it,” Robbie said, watching her type messages on her phone. “Let’s get with the others and see what to do next.” He shut down siege mode and fired up the engine, then turned left, heading towards the CHP building. Other battle wagons and a lot of off-roaders were already there. As he pulled up, Tex parked next to him. The CHP Brass was just coming out of the building. Jules, Ted, Sparky, and Tex walked up to meet them, shaking hands. Robbie and Morgan followed, joined by Justin and Katie.

“I can’t thank you guys enough,” said a tall man in a CHP officer’s uniform, fifty-something with a dark complexion and bushy eyebrows. “I’m Kent Sherman, acting head of the CHP.”

“Hello,” Jules said. “I’m Jules.” He introduced the others, and Sherman introduced the CHP brass.

“You guys have the apps, no?” Jules asked.

“Yes, and we saw the problem coming. The three that were across the street weren’t visible to us until this morning. I’m wondering how the hell they got there.”

“Did you kill them, partner?” Tex asked.

Sherman nodded yes. “We killed them before their friends got here. There were three Islamists and two of those UN creeps. We found them, using that high-resolution PC version of the long-range app.”

“We need to search that building,” Ted said. “Something’s not right. You can’t make RFID chips disappear and re-appear.”

“Yeah, I agree,” Robbie said. “Something doesn’t smell right.”

Sherman glanced at him, then saw Morgan standing there, recognizing her from the video. He bowed at her. “It’s an honor to be in your presence.”

Morgan looked at him, not sure he was talking to her. He smiled. “Sorry. That video testimony really got to me. The whole state is proud of you and the others for what you did. It took courage.”

Morgan smiled, face turning red. “Thank you.”

“Let’s get over there and check this out,” Ted said.

“Maybe we ought to handle that,” Sherman said. “Might be dangerous. There might be stragglers alive.”

“Ted, Sparky, and Tex are former Special Forces,” Jules said. “I former Merc. We can handle. If you have such men, send with us.”

“Oh, sorry,” Sherman said. “We have a couple.” He pulled out his radio. “Teter and Goldberg, get down here. We need folks with Special Forces Training.”

“Roger that,” scratched a voice over the radio speaker. The two men showed up after less than a minute, both carrying M4s. Teter was a six-foot black man with a bald head and huge arms. Goldberg was just as tall, but thinner, with hawkish eyes and salt and pepper hair.

We going into that apartment building?” Goldberg asked.

“Yeah, we need to figure out how they snuck in there without touching off the apps,” Ted said. The men introduced themselves, checked their weapons, and took off towards the apartment building.

***

Clem rode shotgun with Sid in his old Jeep, Yvonne in the back with her rifle.

“Good idea to find the tracks,” Clem said. “That’ll help us focus our surveillance.”

“We also need to look for other likely places that they haven’t used yet,” Yvonne said.

“Yes,” Sid said. They cruised up the loose dirt rising above the pasture behind Garrett’s ranch house.

“It’s a shame those bastards damaged the barn,” Clem said. “Hope he didn’t lose much livestock.”

“He lost two milk cows,” Sid said. “Bastards.”

“That’s too bad,” Clem said. “There’s the tracks there. See them, behind where the mortars were set up?”

“Yeah,” Sid said, “but we need to get out and walk it a bit. There were k-turns and stuff here. I want to find where that thins out to one set of tracks.”

He pulled the Jeep over, and the three of them got out, walking towards the hills.

“I’m losing it,” Clem said, searching the ground in front of them as they walked.

“There it is,” Sid said, pointing ahead of them about twenty yards. “See. It looks like the vehicles came through that pass there, about three hundred yards out.” He pointed.

“Well I’ll be damned,” Clem said, shaking his head. “Injuns,”

Sid flashed him a sheepish grin. “Be nice.”

“I’m in awe,” Clem said, “and that’s the truth.”

“Let’s get back in the Jeep and follow it through the pass,” Yvonne said.

Sid and Clem nodded, and they went back to their Jeep and drove slowly, Sid’s eyes straining out the windshield.

“This pass is narrow,” Yvonne said. “Maybe we ought to bring some dynamite over here and blow it.”

“We’d have to get permission from Garrett,” Clem said. “This pass could be useful for grazing. Look at that pasture land over there. He might not want to cut that off.”

They were through the skinny pass and driving down off the hillside, still on un-grated dirt, rocks hitting the bottom of the Jeep as Sid sped up.

“Look, we’re getting to a fire road,” Sid said, nodding ahead.

“See it,” Clem said. “Wonder where that goes? Hope we can still see the tracks.”

“We will, if it’s not packed too tight,” Sid said. He slowed as they approached it, both sides of the road marked by a loose mound of dirt from the bulldozers that created it. He stopped and jumped out of the Jeep to take a closer look, the others following him.

“Coming from the right side,” Yvonne said.

“Yep, good tracks too,” Sid said. He turned and looked back towards where they came. “Look, you can see the pass from here.”

“I’ll be damned,” Clem said as he looked. “I see more horse tracks than tire tracks on the road.”

“That’s no problem,” Sid said. “Get in. Let’s follow this. We’ll be able to see where they came in.” They got in, and he drove over the hump of dirt on the side of the fire road.

“Wonder if Garrett made these roads?” Clem asked.

“They’re at least a few years old,” Sid said. “Don’t remember when I first heard of this place.”

“It’s been at least five years,” Yvonne said. “Maybe longer.”

Sid sped up.

“Can you see going this fast?” Clem asked.

“We’ll see if they got off the road,” Sid said. “The dirt on the side of the road will be crushed.”

“Oh, I get it,” Clem said.

“This road goes pretty far,” Yvonne said, squinting from the back into the sunny landscape.

“There’s trees up ahead about five hundred yards,” Sid said. “Wonder if there’s a creek there?”

“Looks like it,” Clem said. “Maybe there’s fish.”

Yvonne laughed. “Still a fisherman, eh?”

“Always a fisherman,” Clem said, turning his head back to grin at her. “Seems like a waste of time now, though.”

“Nothing left the road up to that next ridge,” Sid said after they crossed the five hundred yards of flat land. “I’m gonna get out and look.” He stopped on the road and jumped out, rushing in front of the Jeep and kneeling. The others stayed in the Jeep. He stood, looking around, then got back into the driver’s seat.

“Still there?” Yvonne asked.

“Yeah, but this incline had caused some water runoff, so it’s slightly rutted and packed a little better. The tracks are still there, but they might not be in a week.”

“Too shallow?” Clem asked.

“Exactly,” Sid said, putting the Jeep back into gear. They climbed the grade, the road going between clumps of boulders at the summit, then coming down, steeper than the other side.

“I’ll bet somebody had to dynamite boulders out of the way to build this stretch,” Clem said.

“Probably,” Sid said as he dropped the Jeep into a lower gear. “This drive wasn’t much fun at night, I’ll bet.”

“We must be close to the boundary of the property,” Yvonne said. “There’s barb wire ahead, to the left.”

“Garrett might own the land on either side,” Clem said. “I heard him say that they bought up several places over the years to give them what they have now.”

“I’d love to have this much land,” Sid said.

“Land ties you down,” Yvonne said.

Sid shot her a grin. “That’s what my dad used to say.”

“Look, the dirt on the left side of the road is crushed ahead,” Clem said.

“Good eye,” Sid said, slowing as they approached it. “There it is. Somebody took down part of the fence. See?”

“Son of a bitch,” Clem said. “We gonna keep following the tracks?”

“Hell yeah,” Sid said, turning the Jeep in that direction. “Tracks are pretty visible here.”

“Yeah, even a paleface like me can see them,” Clem said, his shoulders shaking as he chuckled. Yvonne rolled her eyes.

Sid slowed as he drove through the broken part of the fence. “Tracks are still strong.”

“What’s that, shining by the side of the road?” Yvonne asked.

“Good question,” Sid said, stopping the Jeep. He got out and trotted over to the reflection, coming back with a can in his hand. “Red Bull.” He tossed the can into the back, behind Yvonne.

“I can’t drink that stuff,” Clem said. “I get the shakes bad.”

“That drink is for the young,” Yvonne said.

Sid kept driving, the tracks still deep enough to see. The terrain was starting to descend slightly, as a small ridge rose out on the right side. They rounded it, and ran into an asphalt road.

“There we go,” Clem said.

“Stay in the Jeep,” Sid said to Clem as he got out, getting down on his hands and knees to look at the tracks near the road, and the asphalt. He got back behind the wheel. “They came in from the right-hand side.”

“You can tell that?” Clem asked.

“Yep,” he said as they started driving. “This is a private road. It’s not maintained very well. Look at the weeds coming up here and there.”

“Yeah, and the edges of the road are breaking up, too,” Clem said.

They road on the rough asphalt for about four miles, no structures in sight, and then the asphalt ended, the road turning to dirt. Sid stopped again and got out, kneeling again.

“Tracks?” Clem asked from his seat.

“Still here,” Sid said. “Nowhere else they could’ve gone, from what I can tell.”

“They must have looked at some good satellite photos to figure out their way in,” Yvonne said.

“That’s what I’m thinking,” Sid said as he got back behind the wheel. They went another several miles when his phone rang. He fished it out of his pocket, slowing down for a moment. “Ed.” He put it on speaker.

“Hey, Ed, what’s up?”

“You guys okay?”

“Of course,” Sid said. “Believe it or not, we’re still following the way the enemy came in last night. It was quite a trek.”

“Okay, then I won’t bother you,” Ed said. “I worry more in my old age, and I can’t afford to lose any more friends.”

“Got you,” Sid said. “We’re fine and we’re armed. It’ll take a while to get back, I suspect, unless this hits a highway that we can use to come back in the front way.”

“Clem with you guys?”

“Yeah, and Yvonne,” he said. “Clem was hoping to find a good place to put some surveillance equipment.”

“Oh, that makes sense. I’ll let you go.”

“Thanks for checking, Ed. See you later.”

Sid ended the call, then looked over at Clem. “You didn’t tell anybody you were coming with us?”

“Sam and Garrett,” Clem said. “Those two are probably wearing out their women.” He and Sid laughed.

“Oh, brother,” Yvonne said. “Minds in the gutter, as usual. Sam and Erica are probably spending quality time with Mia while we have a break.”

“I know, honey,” Sid said. “We’re just joking around.”

“How long does this road go, anyway?” Clem asked.

“There’s the highway up ahead,” Yvonne said.

“Your eyes are so much better than mine,” Sid said.

“Only for distance,” she said. “I can’t track like you. Never could, even when I was young.”

“That’s ten percent eyesight and ninety percent experience,” Sid said. “Do you guys recognize that road?”

“I don’t,” Clem said. “Unless there’s a stream around here, I probably never bothered.”

Sid slowed down as they reached the road, getting out again to look at the ground. He turned towards the Jeep. “Left turn. This looks familiar to me. I’ve been on this road before.”

“We need to find a sign,” Yvonne said.

“I know,” Sid said as he walked back over. He drove onto the road and sped up. After about ten minutes they found a road going off to the right, with a street sign.

“Honey Springs Road,” Clem said, squinting to read it. “Hell, I’ve been on this road a lot of times, just never this far back.”

“Damn,” Sid said. “This leads back to Highway 94, but it’s a long way. We’ll get home faster going back the way we came. Kinda makes sense, though.”

“Makes sense?” Yvonne asked.

“That the enemy would go this way. The junction with Highway 94 is close to Otay Lakes Road.”

“Wow, that is a long way,” Clem said.

“I get it,” Yvonne said. “It’s a long way northwest of Dulzura. They stood a good chance of sneaking in without being seen.”

“Yep,” Sid said. “Shall we go home?”

“Might as well,” Clem said.

Sid turned the Jeep around and they headed back up the highway towards the dirt road.

“Have any ideas on surveillance?” Yvonne asked.

Clem looked back at her and smiled. “Yeah, a couple ideas.”

“Let’s hear them,” Sid said.

“Step one – put some small motion sensor cameras in the area by the break in the fence. The kind with radio transmitters.”

“Okay,” Sid said. “What else?”

“Repair the fence, and put some of those landmines on the far side.”

“Far side?” Yvonne asked. “Why bother to repair the fence? Wouldn’t it be better to leave the break in the fence there, and use that to funnel the enemy over the mines?”

Clem laughed. “We’d have cattle going through there.”

“Oh, crap, you’re right,” Yvonne said. “Kaboom.”

Sid chuckled. “Not a bad idea, but we ought to look along that fence for other good places they might try.”

“I agree,” Clem said. “Those motion sensor cameras are cheap. We could buy about forty and stick them all over the place around there.”

“Sounds like a plan.” Sid said.

***

Jonathan was at his laptop, working the message board for Central Oregon on Ben Dover’s site.

“Hey, babe, should I cook a pizza?” Courtney asked.

“I guess it is dinner time,” Jonathan said, looking at her. She’d cleaned the kitchen and been very interested and helpful, after watching the video testimony of the California women.

“How’s the recruitment going?” she asked, sitting next to him, her arm going on his shoulder. He turned and kissed her, then looked back at the screen.

“I haven’t checked for a while. Been discussing it on the message board that Jared set up here. Lots of people seem interested. Let’s see if they put their money where their mouths are.” He clicked on the metrics link, and his eyes got wide. “Oh my God.”

“What?” Courtney asked, leaning in closer to the screen. “Does that say eighty thousand?”

“Yeah, and look at it ticking up. At this rate, it’ll be over a hundred thousand in the next ten minutes.”

“Wow,” she said.

“I’ve got to call Jared,” he said, picking up his phone. He hit the contact and put it on speaker when it clicked.

“Hey, Jonathan, how goes it?”

“Are you watching the metrics page?”

“Not for a while. We had six hundred people last time I checked.”

Jonathan chuckled. “Look at it now.”

There was silence on the line for a moment, and then a few expletives. Jonathan and Courtney laughed.

“No way,” Jared said. “I expected a decent turnout. This is insane.”

“Guess people are more pissed off than we thought,” Jonathan said.

“I’m cutting it by area code.”

“Good idea,” Jonathan said.

“It’s mostly 970 and 503. Crap, that’s Portland. Who did you contact out there?”

Jonathan chuckled. “All those death metal bands that I do sound for. Most of them promised to put links on their fan websites.”

“It’s gone viral,” Courtney said. “Wonder if we’ll get anywhere near this many folks?”

“That’s the real question,” Jared said. “Maybe we ought to leave earlier so we can help them organize.”

“Maybe we ought to get out of here before the authorities figure out who’s doing this,” Jonathan said. Courtney shot him a worried glance.

“Don’t worry about that, dude. The way this site is set up, all the info on the posters is encrypted. They aren’t gonna find out.”

“They might mess with some of the bands, though, since the info is on their websites.”

“Good point,” Jared said. “You’d better call them.”

“I’ll do that,” Jonathan said. “What time you want to leave?”

“Get some shuteye, and let’s leave at midnight,” Jared said.

“Okay with you, honey?” Jonathan asked, looking at Courtney.

“Yeah,” she said, still looking worried.

“Okay, Jared, I’ll talk with you later.” He ended the call, and then Jonathan tried to call one of the bands. He listened to it ring. No answer.

“Dammit,” Courtney said when he set his phone down.

“Don’t get too upset yet,” he said, turning to his laptop. He clicked on the link to the first band’s website. “Dammit, it’s gone.”

“You just called their phone,” Courtney said. “If the police have that phone, they now have your number.”

“Son of a bitch,” he said. “Throw some stuff in a bag. We’re leaving for Portland now.” He shut down his laptop.

She nodded and got up, running into the bedroom for their clothes. “Call Jared.”

“Yeah,” Jonathan said, hitting the contact. It rang twice, and Jared picked up.

“Leave now.”

“What are you talking about?” Jared asked.

“Can’t raise the first band, and the website is gone. Now they have my number because I tried to call.”

“Slow down,” Jared said.

“No, we’re leaving now. If they know who I am, they’ll figure out about you and the rest of our buds soon enough. Warn them and let’s blow this joint.”

“Crap,” Jared said. “You’re right. Are you taking guns?”

“What do you think?”

To be continued…

 

Bug Out! California Book 1 is now available in the Kindle Store, free in Kindle Unlimited!

 

The Plan – How the Bugout! War Started is now available in the Kindle Store, free in Kindle Unlimited!

 

Bug Out! Texas Book 1 is now just 99 cents in the Kindle Store! Free in Kindle Unlimited! This is the story of Texas Patriots and their struggle against enemies, foreign and domestic, during the Bug Out! War. Chock full of action, adventure, suspense, and romance. Pick up your copy of Bug Out! Texas Book 1 today!

 

Please visit and like my author page on Facebook!

 

Here’s the series that started it all! Bug Out! Pick up your copy of book 1 for just 99 cents in the Kindle Store!

 

Horror Road – A Supernatural Thriller! Available now in the Kindle Store – Book 1 is just 99 cents for a limited time!

 

The first of my full length novels has been published in the Amazon Kindle store, available now. For those of you have have been readying the Bugout! series, the story involves George and Malcolm, and is set about seven years earlier. This book R rated, instead of the PG-13 of the Bugout! Series, so be warned. Here’s the link to “Never A Loose End”

 

Copyright Robert Boren 2017

Bugout! California Part 135 – Northern Recruitment

Jonathan sat in his Bend, Oregon apartment, next to his girlfriend Courtney. He was a well-built young man in his late twenties, wearing a t-shirt and board shorts, with tattoos on his arms and a shaved head. She was small and blonde, both ears covered with rings on the ends, tattoos on her upper arms and neck, with a hint of more beneath her ragged sweatshirt.

“Let’s go someplace,” Courtney said. “I’m bored.”

“In a while,” Jonathan said. “I want to see if they say more about those EU Navy ships.”

She stared at him for a moment, her eyes intense below her nearly invisible blonde eyebrows. “Looking to get arrested again?”

He looked at her and chuckled. “Yeah, maybe.”

“Well count me out, and don’t expect me to use my savings bailing you out again.”

He chuckled. “You like what you see going on in California? I don’t. Those EU ships are bringing over UN Peacekeepers.”

“They aren’t bothering us here.”

“As long as we keep our mouths shut and let them continue to castrate our society,” Jonathan said. His phone rang. “Jared.” He hit the speaker button. “Hey, dude, what’s up?”

“You see the reports of the globalist invasion?” he asked in a thin voice. People in the background chuckled.

“Who’s with you?” Jonathan asked.

“I’m gonna get something to eat,” Courtney said, getting off the couch and going into the dingy kitchen section of the room. She moved dirty dishes around the sink, clanking them as loud as possible, Jonathan shooting her a disgusted look.

“Well?” Jonathan asked.

“Cory, Noah, and Devin,” he said. “Okay?”

“Yeah,” he said. “You know we’re being watched, right?”

“Of course. Screw them. You see what I’m talking about?”

“I heard that there were some EU Navy ships planning to come up the river to Portland Harbor. They ought to get on well there.”

Jared snickered. “They’re being chased by the US Navy.”

“Bull crap,” Jonathan said, shooting a glance at Courtney as she sat down with a yogurt, rolling her eyes at the phone.

“No, really, man,” Jared said. “Did you see those videos of San Francisco and Oakland? The patriots won.”

“Funny, the news hasn’t said anything about it,” Jonathan said sarcastically. That brought another eye roll from Courtney.

“Yeah, it’s funny all right. The videos go up on YouTube, then come down, then get re-posted. I’ve got copies of all of them on my blog. Go take a look, man. It’s awesome.”

“What are you hearing about the ships?” Jonathan asked.

“I heard they were heading to San Francisco with sixty-thousand UN Peacekeepers, to replace folks that Ivan the Butcher has been taking out.”

Jonathan glanced at Courtney as she grabbed the remote and turned on MTV. “We need somebody like that here, or the whole damn state is gonna end up like Portland.”

“They laid Portland out in grids and have checkpoints set up, just like they tried in California,” Jared said. “They won’t call it martial law, of course. At least they’re being manned by the Portland PD instead of the UN.”

“Until now,” Jonathan said. Courtney raised the volume way up on the TV. Jonathan ripped the remote out of her hands, shut the TV off, and tossed the remote onto the battered chair by the opposite wall.

“Hey, dammit, I was watching that,” she said.

“Leave,” Jonathan said. “I’ve had enough.”

“Fine,” she said, stomping into the bedroom.

“Trouble in paradise?” Jared asked.

“She left the room. Mission accomplished.”

“When are you gonna kick her to the curb?”

“I don’t know,” Jonathan said. “Back to the ships. You believe they’re bringing the UN Peacekeepers here?”

“To administer Portland’s martial law? Doubtful. There are plenty of fascists running Portland already – and there’re plenty of their lackeys to keep a compliant population under control.”

“What, then?” Jonathan asked.

“I think they’re getting chased in here, like I was saying. It’ll be interesting to see if the US Navy follows them in.”

Jonathan’s phone dinged with an email receipt. “What’s that?”

“I just sent you a link to the recruitment page from California.”

“Recruitment page?” Jonathan asked.

“Yeah,” he said. “Ben Dover. Remember him?”

Jonathan snickered. “Love the name. That guy’s killer. What about him? They recruiting for California? We’ve got just as bad problems here.”

“Not really,” Jared said. “Not yet, anyway. We don’t have UN thugs pushing the population around. You see that video with the women? Talking about the UN rape operations?”

“Was that for real? The media says it’s fake.”

Jared laughed. “It’s real, trust me. That’s why I’m bothered by a boatload of UN punks showing up here.”

“Does Ben Dover say something about it?”

“He warned of them looking for a safe haven from the US Navy,” Jared said. “If they can’t go elsewhere, they might set up shop here – and I suspect they’ll be going to the places where there are still patriots in control.”

“Like here,” Jonathan said, his heart starting to pound. “What do you suggest we do?”

“Ben Dover’s site can help us. There’s an easy procedure to set up affiliates for recruitment in other states. I say you and I and our buds set up a central Oregon affiliate.”

“Why would we want to do that?” Jonathan asked. “We’ve still got control here.”

“I think we ought to organize a proper welcome for our friendly UN Peacekeepers.”

“If we go in there, we’re liable to get shot or thrown into prison.”

“Don’t be a wuss, Jonathan. With our low population, sixty thousand UN Peacekeepers could get martial law going in Central and Eastern Oregon. You know that.”

“Our local law enforcement might have something to say about that.”

“You know what they did in California. They sidelined the local authorities. Want that to happen here?”

Jonathan sighed. “No. You know I don’t. What do you suggest?”

“Use the link. I’m setting up an affiliate page right now. There will be a link on Ben Dover’s page in about five minutes.”

“What do you want me to do, exactly?” Jonathan asked.

“Spread the link around to all of the message boards you know about. We’re doing the same thing. Flood the internet with it. I’ll have one of my articles on the top explaining what’s going on with the EU Navy ships and the UN – I’ll also link the videos of the women in California and battle video from San Francisco, Oakland, and Sacramento.”

“Sacramento has been liberated?” Jonathan asked.

“Almost,” Jared said. “Understand?”

“When do we expect the EU Navy ships to show up?”

“Late tonight or early tomorrow morning. The snowflakes are planning a massive welcoming demonstration for tomorrow morning at ten. State sanctioned, of course.” There were chuckles in the background.

“How are we gonna get up there in time?” Jonathan asked.

“It’s only three and a half hours,” Jared said. “I say we get on the road no later than six tomorrow morning. We ought to have a huge crowd rolling towards there by then.”

“We aren’t going to get enough people from this part of the state,” Jonathan said. “We’re going to have to recruit a lot of the sane people in Portland.”

“I understand,” Jared said. “You have some inroads in that community. Use them.”

“Okay, I’ll get started right away,” Jonathan said. “Talk to you later.”

“Later, dude,” Jared said. The call ended, and Jonathan rushed to the kitchen table to fire up his laptop. He stared for a moment at the closed door of his bedroom, then logged on, getting to Ben Dover’s recruitment site in seconds. The Oregon link was already up, so he clicked on it, then chuckled at the cheesy graphics that Jared placed on the front page. The links to the videos were there. He clicked on the video of California women’s testimony and watched it in silence, his eyes tearing up, his fists balled tight. He wiped his eyes when it was over, then looked at that closed bedroom door.

“Hey, Courtney, get your ass out here. You have to see this.”

After a moment the door opened slowly, and she came out, brushing her long blonde hair away from her face. “What now?”

“Sit,” he said, getting out of the way. He clicked the link for the video, and watched as Courtney’s eyes got wider and wider.

***

Robbie sat at his laptop in the dinette of the battle wagon, watching the high-res long-range app. He was making notes on a pad of paper next to it. Morgan, Dana, and Karen came in, still chatting.

“Hey, honey, they put out some beer at the building over there, if you’re interested,” Morgan said. He looked up at her for a moment and smiled, then looked back down at his laptop.

“What’s he doing?” Dana asked in a hushed tone.

“I’m using this new high-res app,” he said, looking up at them again. “There’s some movement we ought to be keeping track of.”

“Uh oh,” Morgan said, walking to the dinette. “What?”

“See this?” he asked, pointing to a thin line of icons heading east on Interstate 80. “They’re trying to hide their numbers. See how they’re all spread out?”

“I thought the Islamists were all heading south,” Karen asked, walking over to look.

Dana followed her reluctantly, fear creeping over her face. “I thought we were gonna get a break for a while.”

“Do you think they’re coming here?” Morgan asked.

“No,” Robbie said. “If they were coming for us, they would’ve gotten on Highway 49 in Auburn. See?” He pointed at the screen.

“Not all of them have passed Auburn,” she said.

“True, but it’s not a huge group. I see just under a hundred.”

“Where’d they come from?” Karen asked.

“Nevada,” Robbie said. “The tail end was still on that part of the road when I noticed. They’re moving fast.”

“They’re going to Sacramento,” Dana said after looking at the map for a moment. “Maybe they’re going to attack the Capitol again. They’ve got to be pissed about losing it.”

“That’s not enough people for an assault on the Capitol,” Robbie said, “it’s still crawling with our people.”

“What, then?” Morgan asked.

“I don’t know,” Robbie said, “but the fact that they’re trying to hide themselves tells me they have an operation going. Maybe a kidnapping, or a hit on a small strategic target.”

“Zoom in on Sacramento,” Morgan said. Robbie nodded and did that. “Look. Three hits. Right there. See them? They’re faint. Maybe the people are underground.” He zoomed in.

“Crap,” Karen said, looking closely at the screen. “See what those hits are near?”

“Uh oh,” Robbie said. “The CHP headquarters. They’re going to hit that. I’ll bet what’s left of the leadership is there right now, because of the orders from Governor Hause.”

“He’s the speaker,” Dana said.

“Until we elect a new governor, he’s the governor,” Robbie said, pulling his phone out. “Jules needs to see this.” He texted Jules and asked him to come over.

“I’ll send a message to Tex too,” Karen said.

“Sparky was with them, so they’ll all be here in a sec,” Dana said.

Robbie got off the dinette bench and turned the laptop so it was pointing out into the salon. “Now we can all see it.” He sat back down on the other side of the dinette and grabbed the mouse, zooming out to show the stream of fighters coming in.

“We here,” Jules said, climbing up the steps, Tex and Sparky following him. “What happen?”

“There’s a stream of Islamists coming southwest on I-80,” Robbie said, “and a few hits near the CHP headquarters.”

Jules and Tex shot each other a glance.

“Dammit,” Sparky said. “The CHP is just starting to get back together. The leadership is probably all there right now.”

“I call Ivan,” Jules said. “We might need to show up.” He walked out of the coach with the phone to his ear.

“Glad I didn’t drink much of that beer,” Tex said.

“Seriously,” Karen said.

Jules rushed back inside. “Ivan said go. Get ready.”

“We’ve only got five battle wagons left,” Sparky said.

“We take off-roaders. Let’s go. Chop chop.”

The team was at the gate within minutes, Robbie and Morgan second in the line of coaches, the off-roaders all around them. Tex was in the lead.

“Wish we had more battle wagons,” Morgan said. “A hundred Islamists is a lot.”

“We’ve got a lot of firepower,” Robbie said as he drove forward. “It’ll be enough.”

Their phones dinged with a text message. Morgan brought it up. “There’s sixty CHP officers at the headquarters, and they’ve all got M60s and M4s. They’re setting up an ambush.”

“Excellent,” Robbie said as he drove. “We might not beat them there, you know.”

“I think we’ll be there before the battle starts,” Morgan said. “Assuming they won’t start the attack until the entire force gets there. Some of them are still as far back as Colfax.”

“Good,” Robbie said as they blasted west on Highway 50. It was late afternoon. More people were out than they were used to, now that the enemy had lost control of the area.

“The first of them just made the transition to Highway 160,” Morgan said.

“Does it still look like the CHP headquarters is the target?”

“Oh, yeah,” Morgan said. “That’s the way to get there, unless they want to run through a bunch of surface streets in Sacramento.”

They rode silently for a few minutes, both worried about the battle to come.

“Look, there’s Rancho Cordoba already,” Robbie said. “We’re making good time. Where should I get off?”

She didn’t answer right away. He glanced at her, staring at her screen.

“I think they’re setting up mortars or something,” Morgan said. “The first group stopped before the bridge. They’re on the far side of the American River.”

“Text the others, in case nobody noticed,” Robbie said.

Morgan nodded and did that, getting returns right away. “They see it. Jules plans to send off-roaders into that area.”

“Where should I get off Highway 50?”

“Still working on that,” Morgan said, her fingers pinching out on the screen to zoom in. “This sucks. Any way we go, it’s a slog through surface streets for some ways. I suggest getting off on Sixteenth Street. That would put us into position to fire on enemy vehicles as they come over the bridge.”

“Give me some warning when we get close, okay?”

“Of course,” Morgan said. “The second group just crossed the bridge.”

“Is the first one still across the river?”

“Yep, at about the closest point from which to lob shells,” Morgan said. “Second group just got on Vine street.”

“Where will that put them?”

“If they stay on it, northeast of the CHP building,” she said. “Here comes a third group.”

“On Vine?”

“Just getting onto the bridge,” she said.

“Oh,” Robbie said. “Our street is only two and a half miles away now.”

“Great, we’ll be there at a good time. These slugs have no idea what kind of hornets’ nest they’re about to hit.” She grinned at him.

“I’m worried about those mortars,” Robbie said.

“The third group is on Richard’s Boulevard. That’ll give them a force to the south of the CHP building.”

“Where are the original hits?”

“Same place they’ve been,” Morgan said. “Looks like an apartment building off Seventh Street, right across from the CHP headquarters.”

“Lovely. They’ve probably got weapons stored there, all ready to go.”

“They haven’t been there long,” Morgan said. “We would’ve seen them before.”

“True, they probably didn’t expect the legislature to re-start the CHP.”

“Exactly,” she said. “Another two groups heading over the bridge.”

“There’s our off-ramp,” Robbie said, watching off-roaders and Tex’s coach taking it. “Guess they figured out the way too.”

“Oh, no, it came out in that last message.”

“Maybe we ought to get on Seventh instead. That would put us to the west. Might come in handy.”

“We can get to the bridge before the rest of the force shows up,” Morgan said. “I think we ought to take this like they asked, because we can limit the attack by taking out the stragglers.”

“How many stragglers are we talking about?”

“A third of the force,” Morgan said. “Maybe straggler isn’t the best word.”

“Okay, I’m convinced,” he said, smiling at her as he took the off-ramp.

“The last of them are right by the Haggin Oaks golf course,” Morgan said. “This is gonna be close.”

They flew down the street above the speed limit, past residential neighborhoods and commercial areas.

“It’s pretty in here,” Robbie said.

“You’ll know we’re getting close when it gets more industrial,” Morgan said, eyes glued to the screen.

“Here it comes,” Robbie said, pointing to a factory building, then noticing the tunnel coming up, under the railroad tracks. “Crap, I hope that tunnel is tall enough.”

“It is,” Morgan said, “barely.”

Robbie held his breath as they rolled into it, but they passed through without any contact, coming out into a full-on industrial area. “Okay, where are the bad guys on this side of the river now?”

“Surrounding the CHP Headquarters on all four sides,” Morgan said. “Gonna be hard for them to use the mortars and not hit their own fighters.”

“Look, off-roaders and Jeeps going over the bridge.”

“Good,” Morgan said. “Tex just made a left onto Richards. See him?”

“Yep. He’s turning right into that Diesel shop parking lot.”

“We should go there too,” Morgan said. “Nothing will get past that bridge if we plant ourselves there.”

Robbie nodded and made the left, then a quick right. The next three battle wagons kept going, one moving over to Vine Street, the other two continuing on Richards. A horde of off-roaders followed, going up several of the surrounding streets.

There was a loud blast on the bridge, a truck exploding from Tex’s M19.

“It’s on,” Robbie shouted as they pulled up, seeing another pickup truck with men in the back racing over the bridge. He opened fire with his mini-gun, hitting the truck, knocking it right off the road. There were explosions to the north.

“Off roaders,” Morgan said. “The Islamists on the road just turned before they got to the bridge.” She laughed while she watched her screen.

“What?”

“They are taking the on-ramp off the freeway. One of them just crashed head-on into a semi-truck. That’s gotta hurt.”

“Any others still coming over the river?” Robbie asked.

“Nope,” she said.

“Good, then let’s go that way.” He pointed down Vine street, which they could reach by crossing the parking lot of the tire dealership next door.

Morgan’s fingers typed on her phone. A ding followed. “Go, they’re okay with it,” she said. “Tex will stay here and guard the back door.”

Robbie nodded and backed up the big coach, turning it and crossing an access road onto the tire dealer parking lot to the northwest, then making a right turn onto Vine street. There was still gunfire across the river, and then a mortar round flew, hitting their side of the bank.

“Dammit,” Morgan said. “Get those guys!”

“Are they getting help from the enemy fighters who didn’t make it across the bridge?”

“You guessed it,” Morgan said. “Make a right turn on Tenth Street. That will put you in position to fire on the enemy over there. I’d go into siege mode, though.”

Robbie nodded, making the turn and driving past the last block before the river. He flipped the switches for siege mode, firing several grenades at the mortar team before the shields were all the way up, one of them hitting home.

“Nice shooting,” Morgan said as she pulled the console out and looked at the front and rear machine gun target reticle. “I think I can hit them from here.”

“Do it, but don’t hit our off-roaders.”

“I won’t,” she said, opening fire, sweeping it back and forth, taking out most of the mortar team. Machine gun fire hit the back of the coach, so she switched to the rear machine guns, nailing a truck that was roaring towards them.

Robbie laughed, looking through is sight. “They didn’t expect that.”

“Look, more men running up with mortars,” Morgan yelled. “Try to hit their ammo with a grenade.”

Robbie nodded, firing several grenades, one of them hitting the first ammo box on the left, blowing it up, men running away on fire.

“They’ve got willie pete,” Morgan said, firing at more enemy fighters who were rushing the back of the vehicle. Then there was thunder coming from M60s to the west.

“The CHP officers are on the roof!” Robbie shouted.

“Get those guys bringing up that new mortar,” Morgan shouted. “I have to stay on our rear.”

“Got it,” Robbie said, firing more grenades, then hitting them with several blips from the mini-gun. As soon as that mortar team was dead, another took its place. Then several off-roaders roared over the rolling hills, firing as they went, taking the next mortar team out and then going north to hit the trucks where the rest of the mortar teams were, blowing up their vehicles and chasing down the survivors.

“Yes,” Morgan said, taking a quick glimpse of them, then getting back to the rear sight and firing as yet another truckload of Islamists roared forward.

“Hey, honey, hit them with a grenade. Maybe we can bust it in the road and cut off their access. We’re getting more action than we can handle.”

“I’ll try,” Robbie said, swinging the M19 in that direction and firing, the cab exploding. He hit it again, the gas tank going up as Islamists in the back tried to escape, Morgan peppering them with machine gun fire.

“I’m getting a heat warning on the back guns,” Morgan said.

To be continued…

 

Bug Out! California Book 3 – Rebellion has just been published, and is now available in the Kindle Store, free in Kindle Unlimited!

 

Bug Out! Texas 9 – Patriots Unleashed has just been published, and is now available in the Kindle Store, free in Kindle Unlimited!

 

Bug Out! California Book 2 – Resistance has just been published, and is now available in the Kindle Store, free in Kindle Unlimited!

 

Bug Out! California Book 1 is now available in the Kindle Store, free in Kindle Unlimited!

 

Bug Out! Texas Book 8 – West Border Mayhem is now available in the Kindle Store, free in Kindle Unlimited!

 

The Plan – How the Bugout! War Started is now available in the Kindle Store, free in Kindle Unlimited!

 

Bug Out! Texas Book 7 – Flood of Patriots – next in the series is now available in the Kindle store, free in Kindle Unlimited!

 

Bug Out! Texas Book 6 – Citizen Vengeance – next in the series is now available in the Kindle store, free in Kindle Unlimited!

 

Bug Out! Texas Book 5 – Wave of Patriots – next in the series is now available in the Kindle store, free in Kindle Unlimited!

 

Horror Road Book 4 – the latest in the series is now available in the Kindle store!

 

Bug Out! Texas Book 4 – Texas Battle Cry is now available in the Kindle store!

 

Bug Out! Texas Book 3 – Republic in Peril is now available in the Kindle store!

 

Bug Out! Texas Book 2 – The New Republic is now available in the Kindle Store. Pick up your copy of this exciting thriller today!

 

Bug Out! Texas has just been published in the Kindle Store! This is the story of Texas Patriots and their struggle against enemies, foreign and domestic, during the Bug Out! War. Chock full of action, adventure, suspense, and romance. Pick up your copy of Bug Out! Texas Book 1 today!

 

Please visit and like my author page on Facebook!

 

Here’s the series that started it all! Bug Out! Pick up your copy of book 1 for just 99 cents in the Kindle Store!

 

Horror Road – A Supernatural Thriller! Available now in the Kindle Store

 

The first of my full length novels has been published in the Amazon Kindle store, available now. For those of you have have been readying the Bugout! series, the story involves George and Malcolm, and is set about seven years earlier. This book R rated, instead of the PG-13 of the Bugout! Series, so be warned. Here’s the link to “Never A Loose End”

 

Copyright Robert Boren 2016

Bugout! California Part 134 – Acting Governor

People on the main street of Dodge City hurried about to their jobs in the early morning light, as the leadership converged on the saloon for a meeting.

“We all know what happened last night,” Garrett said, “and we all know that there are nearly two hundred thousand Islamists heading this way.”

“Yep,” Trevor said. “They’re halfway between Mohave and Highway 395 at the moment. They’ll take that south, probably.”

Sam looked at his phone. “They might take the far eastern route. Head for I-40, then take Highway 95 south. If I were them I’d be afraid of having to go through San Bernardino. Lots of patriots there.”

“Good point,” Trevor said.

“We need to get on social media and round up a whole lot of citizens, if they’re really sending two hundred thousand fighters our way,” Sid said.

“Ivan working,” Ji-Ho said. “Just got text message. He knows what go on.”

“How are we gonna protect ourselves here?” Justin asked.

“Yeah, this area is big,” Ed said. “Too many square miles to cover.”

“Maybe we try to find their shielded vehicles and destroy them,” Trevor said. A few people chuckled.

“How are we gonna do that?” Garrett asked.

“Trevor has something there,” Sid said. “The amount of lead they need to mount a large attack isn’t that easy to come by. If they’re really tooling up to do this, I’ll bet we can find out where they got it.”

Sam grinned. “And when we find that out, we can find them.

“Exactly,” Sid said.

“But how we gonna find that out?” Garrett asked.

“Put Seth on it,” Justin said.

“Yeah, good idea,” Trevor said. “He’s great on the internet. He can figure it out. It’s not like we have a thousand sources. It’s probably more like ten.”

“Where is Seth, anyway?” Sam asked.

“He was up all night working that tracking program,” Kaitlyn said. “I let him sleep.”

“That’s going to help us too, you know,” Sid said. “When we see these slugs disappear, we’ll know what’s about to happen. Seth’s doing important work.”

“That’s a great point,” Justin said.

“You guys talking about me?” Seth asked as he walked in.

“You’re up already?” Kaitlyn asked.

“Yeah, once I woke up I couldn’t sleep anymore. I got that program finished last night.”

“Wow, really?” Kaitlyn asked.

“What does it do, exactly?” Garrett asked.

“I’m running the PC version of the app on my server,” Seth said. “It’s going to take a snapshot of the icons in the entire Southern California area every five minutes and save it to a database, so we can see movements and disappearing – reappearing hits.”

“That will tell us if they’re mounting an attack using shielded vehicles,” Sam said.

“If we aren’t too late gathering the data,” Seth said. “I can’t get history. I can only compile what’s happening since I turned this thing on.”

“If we couple that capability with the lead shielding investigation and our social media operation, it might solve most of our problems,” Sid said.

“What lead shielding investigation?” Seth asked.

“Funny you should ask,” Sam said. He took a few minutes to explain it to Seth. “Think you can help us with that?”

Seth smiled. “Yep, that’s right up my ally. When do you want me to start?”

“As soon as possible,” Garrett said. “Meanwhile we’ve got to figure out a band-aid for this place.”

“Hey, Clem, you got any ideas?” Sam asked. “You did pretty well at my RV Park.”

“Not well enough to save the folks,” Clem said, “but yeah, I’ve got some ideas.”

“Good, then start drawing up some plans,” Sam said, “and I’ll help however I can.”

“Let me know what supplies needed,” Ji-Ho said. “I get from Ivan. Also getting more battle wagons and more ammo and guns. Already on way.”

“More battle wagons?” Justin asked. “Seriously?”

“Yes,” Ji-Ho said. “And off-roaders based on Texas design. Help patrol area and use in attacks.”

“You guys are gonna make my cavalry obsolete,” Garrett said.

“No way,” Sam said. “I’d rather see your men with M4s or AKs than those Winchesters, but the cavalry is very effective in this type of terrain. You guys have saved us more than once. I’m impressed.”

Garrett smiled. “Thank you kindly,” he said. “Maybe we can get enough ammo from Ivan to switch our guns out. I’d be okay with that. I’ll kinda miss the smoke and the smell, though.”

Trevor laughed. “Hell, I think those cannons are awesome.”

A few people in the room chuckled.

“I’m gonna go get busy, if you guys don’t need me here,” Seth said.

“I’ll stick around and tell you what happened,” Kaitlyn said. Seth kissed her and left the room.

“We need to protect that kid,” Sam said. “He’s got skills.”

Kaitlyn smiled proudly. “He does, doesn’t he?”

“Maybe I should start working some surveillance plans,” Clem said.

“I think this meeting is about over,” Garrett said. “I’m going to keep the patrols going at a higher level until we get other things in place. Talk to you folks later.”

Everybody except Willard left the saloon.

***

Mr. White sat in the front of the bus, M60 across his lap, the back a mix of armed commandos and state elected officials. Machine gun fire and explosions could be heard as they approached the State Capitol area. He pulled out his phone and hit a contact.

“Ivan, others in place?”

“Yes,” Ivan said. “Seventy-thousand armed citizens are coming in to help the other commando team. The enemy is holding the Capitol grounds between Ninth Street and Thirteenth Street. They’re well-armed, but the commandos are wearing them down.”

“Still protecting capitol building, right?”

“Yes, they’re trying not to blow that building up. Are the other three buses still behind you guys?”

“Yes sir,” Mr. White said. “And hoard of off-roaders on way too. We really have seventy thousand civilians?”

“Yep, and there’s more behind them. Ben Dover is getting really good at this.”

“True, but people smell blood in water, which help him. People had enough. Rampage coming.”

“Yes, my friend,” Ivan said. “We’re gonna take the top half of the state back. Then the problem will be the south.”

“True that two-hundred thousand Islamists are on way?”

“True, and so far we’ve only been able to raise about a hundred thousand there with the social media blitz.”

“How long was effort?”

Ivan chuckled. “About half the time we spent working the Sacramento area, and that had a smaller population to work with, so I still have hope.”

“Good,” Mr. White said.

“Where are you?”

“Off freeway, just passed Sutter’s Fort on L Street.”

“Perfect,” Ivan said. “I’ll let you go.”

“Talk later, boss.” Mr. White put the phone back in his pocket. The white-haired man sitting behind him poked him on the shoulder.

“Sir, do we get to fight?”

“You elected official?” Mr. White asked.

“I was Speaker of the Assembly,” the man said. “Garrison Hause.”

“Too important to get shot,” Mr. White said.

“I’m pissed at these guys,” Speaker Hause said.

“Then be smart when back in office. Stop bad guys. Don’t help them.”

He sat for a moment, tears forming in his eyes. “I guess I deserve that.”

“Yes, do, but not over. Become great man. You can.”

“Mind if we move around, talk?” Speaker Hause asked.

“Be my guest,” Mr. White said. “You free man again. Do job.”

He nodded at Mr. White, then turned around. “Members of the legislature, let’s meet. Switch seats, come up here.”

Half the people on the bus got up and moved forward, the commandos moving to the rear.

“Thanks,” Speaker Hause said, sitting sideways in the seat so he could look at those behind him. “We need to discuss what we do when we get back on the job. I believe job one is to restore the bureaucracy and re-take control of all state offices.

The tall black man towards the back of the group laughed out loud.

“Senator Wilson, do you have something to say?” Hause asked.

“Are you ready to admit that we need borders, and that we have a right to keep illegal aliens and phony refugees out of our nation? Because if you aren’t ready to admit that and move forward against that policy, we might as well just shoot ourselves.”

“I think that’s a little extreme,” said a small Hispanic man towards the front.

“Yeah, I figured you’d say that, Assemblyman Lopez,” Wilson said.

Mr. White shook his head, his expression one of disgust. “You have everything, deserve nothing.”

“Yeah, he’s right,” Wilson said. “We’ve got a war going. We’ve got citizens being attacked and killed. The first thing we need to do is capture or kill every damn UN Peacekeeper in the state. That is job one. Then we need to capture or kill each and every Islamist thug. After that’s done, we can go back to bickering about sanctuary cities and Islamophobic speech.

“That’s not a very enlightened attitude,” Lopez said.

“Are you serious?” asked another man, a pasty-looking red-haired man with a face that didn’t fit the color.

“Yeah, Senator Reilly, the idiot is serious,” Wilson said.

“Stop the bickering,” Hause said. “It’s not helpful. We aren’t going to target Muslims in this state. I’m all for deporting the UN Peacekeepers. We asked them to come in and they failed. Now we can ask them to leave.”

Mr. White doubled over laughing. “That rich.”

“What do you mean?” Hause asked.

“UN occupying force, not helpers for time of need,” Mr. White said. “Islamists worse. Kill like the dogs they are.”

“There aren’t even many Islamists here,” Hause said. This time both Mr. White and Wilson laughed hard.

“You want to see size of Islamist problem?” Mr. White asked. He pulled out his phone and fired up the long-range app, then showed him the Islamic fighters on the way south. “You see this?”

“What is that?” Hause asked, as others got closer to take a look, flooding the aisle in the bus.

“Each icon is one Islamic fighter. They have RFID chips. You people need to catch up fast. Lot happened while you were locked up.”

“My God, how many men is that?” Lopez asked.

“Roughly two hundred thousand,” Mr. White said.

“What?” Hause asked, his eyes wide. “Where are they going?”

“They go south to re-open I-8 and other roads down south, so they can help seven hundred thousand Islamic fighters come into California from Mexico.”

Wilson chuckled. “So now can we get serious?”

“I’m almost afraid to ask,” Reilly said. “How many UN Peacekeepers are still here?”

“We not sure,” Mr. White said. “UN Peacekeepers no have RFID, so we can’t see. Less than Islamists. Citizens been doing jobs for you slugs. Retake San Francisco and Oakland already, kill many thousand Peacekeepers. Almost have Sacramento back. Final battle goes on at Capitol.”

“So, we really have no idea?” Lopez asked.

“Boss said EU Navy ships coming with another sixty thousand,” Mr. White said. “Was coming to Bay Area. Now going up north because Bay Area lost. We should sink boat.”

Hause showed an expression of disbelief. “The EU is in on this?”

“Why is that a surprise?” Wilson asked. “They want a global government with themselves at the top. Why don’t you get that?”

“Who else is against us?” Hause asked.

“Saladin and the Caliphate,” Mr. White said. “Funny. EU think they subjugate people together and live happily ever after. Islamists bide time, take over everything, impose sharia, kill infidel in mass numbers. EU very foolish.”

“What’s still left?” Hause asked.

“What mean?” Mr. White asked.

“National guard? Police organizations?”

“Disbanded or killed, mostly,” Mr. White said. “Some can be brought back. Citizens probably win before you get all back, but should try. That my advice. Call up National guard, and get police departments and CHP back to work. Give them real weapons, not pea-shooter. Understand?”

“Where did you get that phone?” Reilly asked.

“Normal phone with special apps from General Hogan’s team. Ivan have one for each of you. You get when we arrive. Oh, and by the way, look.” He moved the app to Washington DC and the Mid-Atlantic, showing a sea of icons.

“My God,” Wilson said. “You liberals have killed us all.”

“Stop,” Mr. White said. “You understand, so stop bicker and start work. Past arguments not matter. Survival. Liberty. All that matter now. Lay blame and argue later if must, but not today.”

“He’s right,” Lopez said. “I’m ashamed. We all should be. We need to redeem ourselves. We need to work for the people.”

“Now you think correctly,” Mr. White said. “Get ready. We close to hot zone. We pull on side street, building is set up. Phone banks, weapons, your cellphones, also documentation to get you up to speed, since you in stir so long.”

“We can thank Ivan for all of this?” Hause asked.

“Ivan and others,” Mr. White said. “Many patriots still out there. Give us fighting chance.”

The buses made a right turn on 17th Street and pulled to a stop next to a large building. Mr. White stood up. “Come, hurry, run into parking structure, we enter building from there, under cover.”

The buses emptied out, the elected officials and commandos rushing into the building as the gunfire continued, just two blocks away.

***

Jules, Tex, Sparky, and Ted sat in folding chairs under the corrugated metal stall between two battle wagons. Jules had a bandage around his forehead, which the doctor had put on half an hour ago.

“Hot today,” Tex said, wiping sweat off his forehead. “Wish we could have a few beers.”

“Yeah, that’d be nice,” Ted said.

“Probably could have one or two,” Jules said. “Ivan text. Sacramento fell. Legislature back in place…what left of, anyway.”

“How many survived?” Sparky asked.

“One third, give or take,” Jules said. “Some maybe escaped, will join later. Many died in prison or during capture.”

“Well, I hope they’ve learned something,” Tex said. “We ought to have a part time legislature here, like we’ve got in Texas. Keeps them under control a little better.”

“What’s our next objective?” Ted asked.

“Still wait for Ivan,” Jules said. “May be able to leave north half of state soon. Big trouble brewing in south. Ji-Ho and Sam need us.”

“What’s left up here to liberate?” Sparky asked.

“Bay area under our control from San Jose to Santa Rosa. Sacramento now. Boss say boatload of UN Peacekeepers on way north. US Navy chasing now.”

“How many Peacekeepers they talking about, partner?”

“Sixty grand,” Jules said. “Much smaller problem than Islamists now.”

“I’ve been watching the Islamists move south,” Ted said. “The first group is almost to Yucca Valley.”

“Dammit,” Sparky said, pulling out his phone. He looked silently for a moment, his teeth grinding. “It’s pretty obvious what they’re doing.”

“What’s that, partner?” Tex asked.

“They can take Highway 62 to Highway 95. That leads right down to the part of I-8 that’s closest to the border.”

“Wait, they’re that close?” Ted asked. “Do we need to airlift forces over to stop them?”

Sparky shook his head no, not looking up from his phone. “They’re really well spread out. The furthest I see them now is Landers, but it’s a small number so far. Some of them are still up north as far as Bakersfield. Some of them haven’t moved for several hours. Almost looks like they’re digging in, waiting for something.”

“Is it still a couple hundred thousand?” Tex asked. Sparky shook his head yes.

“I’ve got a bad feeling about this,” Ted said.

“You not kidding,” Jules said. “Look at numbers of Islamists over border, though. Changing last time I looked.”

“When was the last time you looked?” Sparky asked, as he moved the view south of the border.

“Before doctor get here,” Jules said. “Three hour.”

“Whoa,” Sparky said.

“What you see?” Jules asked.

“Looks like about half of them are moving southeast,” Sparky said, looking over at Tex.

“Crap,” Tex said, pulling his phone out to look.

“Governor Nelson see them,” Jules said, “got apps before us. They ready, trust me.”

“Hope you’re right,” Tex said.

“Hey, Jules, you might want to watch this,” Shelly said from the door of Tex’s coach.

“What?” Jules asked, getting up.

“Press conference starting in a few minutes,” Karen said, standing next to her. “California legislature.”

The four men got up and went into the coach, finding seats with their women. The camera was already on in the room, pointing at a podium with the California State Seal on the front.

“Wonder who’s speaking?” Ted asked.

“They haven’t said,” Haley whispered to him.

“It’s the Speaker,” Sparky said, watching Speaker Hause take the podium. Eight other members of the legislature came on the stage and stood behind him, a mixture of both parties.

“Hello, fellow Californians,” he began. “We have been in Folsom Prison since before Martial Law was declared, and are deeply sorry for the actions of the UN Peacekeepers and others who have been illegally oppressing California citizens during our confinement.”

He paused for a moment, on the verge of tears, composing himself to go on.

“I am currently the acting governor of our great state, because the Governor, the Lieutenant Governor, and the President Pro Tem of the Senate were all killed by the enemy. The job now falls to the Speaker of the Assembly. I ask for your support as we bring California back under the control of the people.”

“A lot of this is his fault,” Ted said.

“Give him a chance, honey,” Haley said.

“Our first actions will be to bring the criminal UN and the Islamist Army to justice. I am ordering that all California Law Enforcement Officers return to their jobs for further instructions, and I am activating the National Guard as well. This will not be enough to beat the enemy, but we have a robust citizenry who have already taken up the fight, and are, in fact, responsible for our rescue. We will work together with them to bring the state back under control, and to defeat the enemy on all fronts.”

Is this going to be too little, too late?” Shelly asked.

“The citizens must join,” Jules said, his brow furrowed. “They must trust. It might not be easy, but we already in fight.”

“This is a good development,” Sparky said. “At least I hope it is.”

“Look, he’s done already,” Karen said, watching the men leave the stage.

“Do you want to watch the talking heads?” Dana asked. “I think I’ll go outside.”

“They partly responsible for problem,” Jules said, standing. “I go call Ivan.”

He left the coach, Shelly following him. They both froze as the gate of the compound opened.

“What’s that?” Shelly asked. Their battle wagon rolled through the gate.

“They fix!” Jules said. “We got home back!” They watched as the massive rig was driven in, making a K-turn and backing into an empty space at the north end of the row.

 

To be continued…

 

Bug Out! California Book 3 – Rebellion has just been published, and is now available in the Kindle Store, free in Kindle Unlimited!

 

Bug Out! Texas 9 – Patriots Unleashed has just been published, and is now available in the Kindle Store, free in Kindle Unlimited!

 

Bug Out! California Book 2 – Resistance has just been published, and is now available in the Kindle Store, free in Kindle Unlimited!

 

Bug Out! California Book 1 is now available in the Kindle Store, free in Kindle Unlimited!

 

Bug Out! Texas Book 8 – West Border Mayhem is now available in the Kindle Store, free in Kindle Unlimited!

 

The Plan – How the Bugout! War Started is now available in the Kindle Store, free in Kindle Unlimited!

 

Bug Out! Texas Book 7 – Flood of Patriots – next in the series is now available in the Kindle store, free in Kindle Unlimited!

 

Bug Out! Texas Book 6 – Citizen Vengeance – next in the series is now available in the Kindle store, free in Kindle Unlimited!

 

Bug Out! Texas Book 5 – Wave of Patriots – next in the series is now available in the Kindle store, free in Kindle Unlimited!

 

Horror Road Book 4 – the latest in the series is now available in the Kindle store!

 

Bug Out! Texas Book 4 – Texas Battle Cry is now available in the Kindle store!

 

Bug Out! Texas Book 3 – Republic in Peril is now available in the Kindle store!

 

Bug Out! Texas Book 2 – The New Republic is now available in the Kindle Store. Pick up your copy of this exciting thriller today!

 

Bug Out! Texas has just been published in the Kindle Store! This is the story of Texas Patriots and their struggle against enemies, foreign and domestic, during the Bug Out! War. Chock full of action, adventure, suspense, and romance. Pick up your copy of Bug Out! Texas Book 1 today!

 

Please visit and like my author page on Facebook!

 

Here’s the series that started it all! Bug Out! Pick up your copy of book 1 for just 99 cents in the Kindle Store!

 

Horror Road – A Supernatural Thriller! Available now in the Kindle Store

 

The first of my full length novels has been published in the Amazon Kindle store, available now. For those of you have have been readying the Bugout! series, the story involves George and Malcolm, and is set about seven years earlier. This book R rated, instead of the PG-13 of the Bugout! Series, so be warned. Here’s the link to “Never A Loose End”

 

Copyright Robert Boren 2017

Bugout! California Part 133 – Folsom Blues

Seth was hunched over his laptop, sitting at the battle wagon’s dinette when Kaitlyn came in. It was late in the evening.

“Hey, honey,” Seth said, looking up from his screen for a moment, then going right back to it.

“What are you doing?”

“Acting on a suggestion in the meeting at the saloon,” Seth said, eyes glued to the screen.

“Am I going to have to keep asking you questions?”

Seth looked up at her and smiled, then leaned back in his seat. “Sorry.”

She came over to the dinette. “Move over.” He did, and she slid in next to him. “Okay, what?”

“We need a historical look at the RFID hits,” he said. “I was working on a program to record the hits every five minutes.”

“And how are you gonna do that?”

“It’s a little hinky, actually. I set up a macro on the tablet to run the long-range app on Southern California and send the results in files to my blog server account. Then I’ll create an excel model to display the data and do analysis.”

“I’m an expert in Excel, you know,” Kaitlyn said. “I can probably help with that part.”

“That’s right, you’re an accounting major,” Seth said. “That would be cool.”

“How late are you going to work tonight?”

“Not much longer,” he said, looking at her.

“Good. Watching you work is getting to me.”

“Oh, really?” Seth asked, looking into her beautiful face, her dark eyes dilated.

“Smart men turn me on,” she said, moving closer, kissing him.

“Quitting time,” Seth said breathlessly, closing his laptop. She giggled. Then Seth’s phone rang. “Uh oh, it’s Ji-Ho. I’ll put it on speaker.”

He set the phone on the table, answered the call, and hit the speaker button.

“Seth? Sorry to call late. It Ji-Ho.”

“No problem,” Seth said. “What’s going on?”

“I remember something Ivan told me about apps,” he said. “There is PC version. Much higher resolution than iOS or Android version. I talked to Ivan, he get permission from General Hogan to give to you. I send link. What email?”

Seth read it out to him, and a couple seconds later, the mail app on his laptop dinged. He opened it.

“Got it,” Seth said. “This will be helpful. I can set it up to run on my blog server.”

“It secure?” Ji-Ho asked.

“Yep, it’s very secure,” Seth said.

“Okay, I leave you to it,” Ji-Ho said. “Have fun. See later.” The call ended.

“Now this won’t be hinky anymore,” Seth said as he uploaded the software package to his blog server.

“Where is this server?” Kaitlyn asked.

“Outfit in Montana. I contract with them.”

“Why does this make things less hinky?”

“I can turn this thing on and schedule the running and information compilation,” Seth said. “It will run no matter where we are…actually it’ll keep going even if something happens to me, but I’ll need to give the rest of the team access.”

“You’re going to be up for a while, aren’t you?” she asked.

“Mind?”

“No, do your thing. Wake me up when you get to bed, if you’re still in the mood.”

“There’s always the morning,” Seth said.

“True,” she said, getting out of the booth. She went into the bedroom, and Seth got back to work.

***

Jules was behind the wheel of the battle wagon, the lead vehicle in the caravan, flying west on Highway 50 towards Folsom. Shelly was riding shotgun, Sparky and Dana sitting on the couch.

“This facility isn’t that easy to get into,” Shelly said, brow furrowed as she looked at the GPS map on her phone. “There’s a couple roads in. There is a lot of dirt, though, to the north. Also looks like an abandoned quarry makes up the south boundary, but it’s mostly inside prison walls.”

Sparky laughed. “Maybe that’s where they made the big rocks into the little rocks, back in the old days.”

Dana chuckled and elbowed him.

“That funny,” Jules said. “What’s to west?”

“The American River,” Shelly said. “Natural boundary. I think these coaches will have to go up Folsom Prison Road. We should send the off-roaders in from the north.”

“Are there gun towers?” Sparky asked. “Those off-roaders aren’t armored.”

“It’s a little hard to tell,” she said. “Wait, yes, there is one, on the southeast corner of the wall, right by the main gate as you drive up on Folsom Prison Road. There’s also one north of that, and one in-between the main part of the prison and that quarry-looking place.”

“So we pull up and shoot the first tower with M19,” Jules said. “Then continue down, hit the other one.”

“This is a huge facility,” Shelly said. “Do we know where the state officials are being held? There’s a ton of buildings.”

“Ivan say east facing cell blocks,” Jules said.

“Mr. Black and Mr. White are going in first, right?” Sparky asked.

“They’re going inside first, but we’re needed to poke holes in walls, take out towers.”

“This makes me nervous as hell,” Dana said.

“We aren’t driving inside this dump, are we?” Sparky asked.

“Not if I can help it,” Jules said. “That just where Saladin want us, no?”

Sparky chuckled. “Yeah, you’ve got a point. I doubt if that cretin is even around now. Been following the attacks in San Francisco and Oakland, and they’re spreading fast. They’re on the way to losing Palo Alto now, too.”

“Good, we shut down cash cow,” Jules said.

“We’re going to get off at East Bidwell Street,” Shelly said. “Take that to Wales Drive. Then follow that around and get onto East Natoma. Prison Road is off that street. You’ll make a left.”

“What then?” Sparky asked.

“It’s an access road. Don’t see any gates or anything. We’ll take that past a huge parking lot, and then the first tower with the old gate is right there.”

“There’s sign for Bidwell,” Jules said. “Two miles.”

“I’d take the guns out as soon as we get on Prison Drive,” Sparky said, looking at his phone.”

“Yes, I agree,” Shelly said. “That tower is gonna come up fast. They might have some big guns.”

“We should go in with our lights off,” Sparky said. “Take out the tower before you cross Ryan Parkway.”

“Why?” Jules asked.

“It’ll be tough for them to see us from there, but we should have a clear shot to the tower.”

“We should send the off-roaders in a different way,” Sparky said. “So they can come in from the north.”

“I wouldn’t bother,” Shelly said. “There’s no easy way to avoid Prison Road, but it looks like there’s a lot of ways for them to get on the south side of the prison grounds, and to sneak around to the north side as well. That north wall has some buildings that don’t look like cell blocks to me, and we’d have to go through those.”

“Don’t worry, off-roaders think on fly,” Jules said. “They’re there for diversion like us, to help Mr. White and Mr. Black come in with commando team.”

“There’s your turn, honey,” Shelly said. Jules nodded and took it, following Bidwell as it snaked through shopping areas and residential tracts.

“Nice area,” Jules said.

“Too hot,” Dana said. “I’ve been here in the summer before. Not great.”

“Yeah, it can get a little warm here,” Sparky said. “See anybody around?”

“Nope, dead so far,” Jules said.

“I’ll tell you when to turn your lights off,” Shelly said.

“There’s some moon out there,” Sparky said. “I think we should shut them down now. Otherwise anybody in that parking lot will see us coming.”

Jules reached for the headlight switch and turned them off. “No problem, I can drive. Plenty light, no?”

“I’ll text the others,” Shelly said.

The rumble of distant artillery floated to them, just as everybody’s phones dinged with a broadcast text.

“Sutter’s Mill battle?” Jules asked.

“Yep,” Sparky said, looking at his phone. “It’s on.”

“There’s the parking lot,” Shelly said. “Might want to slow down, and raise the weapons.”

“I do,” Jules said, flipping the switches. The sight came down in front of him. He pushed it to one side as he drove next to the parking lot. There were lights coming from the prison gate, barely in view. “There tower, see?”

Machine gun fire hit the coach, scratching the bullet-proof glass on the front windshield.

“Now I got you,” Jules said, pulling the sight over. He let several grenades fly, all of them hitting the dower, reducing it to rubble and stopping the gunfire.

“Blast the gates and the wall!” Sparky shouted, as he got up and grabbed his M60.

Shelly pulled the console tray out and manned the forward machine guns. “Look, cretins coming out the gate!” She opened fire, mowing them down as they continued past the main gate, heading for the second tower. Jules fired at that, missing with the first shot but hitting with the second and third, blowing the top of the tower right off the wall. Then he aimed at the wall and started firing at one spot, blowing a hole in short order, then moving down further and doing the same in other spots. By now, the other battle wagons were in place, firing their grenade launchers at the walls, breaking it in several spots. The off-roaders rolled in at high speed, spewing grenades and machine gun fire, chasing down several UN vans who were attempting to leave the area.

“Okay, we go into siege mode here,” Jules said, getting to the far northeast corner of the wall, where the tower had been. He turned on siege mode, the armor plates coming down, covering the windshield and the wheels, as small arms fire pelted them from the east.

“Enemy fighters over there in that huge warehouse,” Sparky yelled, moving to the passenger-side gun slits and firing at them with his M60. Jules fired with his mini gun, slicing holes in the corrugated metal walls, then firing grenades inside one after the other, men fleeing the building, right into Sparky’s M60, most of them hit before they got under cover. More rushed out, and other coaches opened fire on the men and the buildings. A couple small secondary explosions went off inside the warehouse.

“Hey, there’s munitions in warehouse,” Jules shouted. “Text others. Let’s hit with salvo of grenades.” He aimed and started firing the M19, sending grenade after grenade into the building, two other coaches behind him doing the same. Then there was a massive explosion, hitting the side of the coach, knocking it on the driver’s side and slamming it into the prison wall. Jules felt his head hit the side of the coach, then blacked out.

***

“We go,” Mr. White said, glancing at Mr. Black, who nodded back at him. They rushed through the broken main gate, diving for cover as machine gun fire erupted from one of the out buildings. Several off-roaders roared through the gate, firing grenades, blowing that building up as the commando team rushed to the front door of the cell block.

“Blow door,” Mr. Black said. One of his commandos rushed toward it, staggering as he was hit by gunfire from one of the windows above. Mr. White opened fire, hitting the Peacekeeper as a second commando rushed forward and picked up the plastic explosive. He got the charge set as the rest of the team covered him, then blew it, the door blowing off its hinges. They rushed inside, small arms fire coming at them, the team diving for cover and returning fire, knocking out several Peacekeepers who were by the stairs.

“You know where are,” Mr. White said. They hurried to the cell block, killing several more Peacekeepers who were guarding the door.

“Blow door,” Mr. Black said. A commando ran over and placed the charge, and they all got back. The door blew open and they rushed in with guns at the ready.

“Who are you?” asked one of the prisoners, and old gentleman with white hair.

“We here to rescue you,” Mr. Black said.

“Which side are you on?” asked another, a tall black man.

“People of California,” Mr. Black said. “Ivan’s men.”

“Who’s Ivan?” a third asked.

Mr. White and Mr. Black looked at each other and smiled.

“You get no news here, eh?” Mr. Black asked. “We resistance. We taking state back from UN and Islamists. Come. We leave.”

There was a massive explosion outside, shaking the building.

“Uh oh, no like sound of that,” Mr. Black said.

“C’mon, let’s get prisoners out of cells,” Mr. White said, looking at the group of commandos.

“Where are you taking us?” the tall black man asked.

“Back to your jobs,” Mr. White said.

***

“Jules!” Shelly cried, shaking him, trying to get his seatbelt off. Sparky and Dana climbed over, walking on the wall to the front of the coach.

“We need to get out of here before the gas tank gets hit with something.

“It shielded,” Jules said, eyes fluttering open. “All okay?”

“This thing is built like a frigging tank,” Sparky said. “C’mon, let’s get that door open.”

“What happen to gunfire?” Jules asked.

“It was done a few minutes ago,” Sparky said. “Just before you woke up.”

There was hammering on the door. Sparky climbed over and unlocked it, helping to push it open. Tex stuck his head in.

“Howdy, Partner. Ever considered getting into the rodeo?”

Jules snickered. “Funny ha ha. Help us out.” He looked over at Shelly, who was on the verge of tears. “I okay, honey, really. Bump on head. Not bad.”

Shelly eyed him. “We need to get you looked at right away.”

“It’s okay,” Jules said.

“She’s right, partner,” Tex said. “C’mon. The commando team already got the prisoners out of here.”

“How?” Jules asked.

“Prison buses,” Sparky said. “There were several in the back parking lot.”

“How many men freed?”

“About forty,” Tex said, “according to the text I got a few minutes ago.”

“That’s not very many,” Shelly said.

“Lots were killed, from the sound of it,” Dana said. “C’mon.”

“Yeah, we’ll take you home in our rig,” Tex said. “Let’s get all the guns, though, and the ammo for the mini gun and the M19.”

They were out of the broken coach with the ammo and guns after a few minutes. Karen was pacing next to her rig, her eyes lighting up when she saw Tex walking over.

“Nobody got hurt?” she asked, looking at the four passengers walking up.

“Jules got knocked out for a few minutes,” Tex said. “C’mon, let’s get inside before some sniper takes a pot shot.”

“Where other coaches?” Jules asked.

“Already on their way home,” Karen said. “There’s still off-roaders around to escort us, just in case.”

“That good, let’s go,” Jules said, helping Shelly up. Soon they were on their way, going south on Prison Road.

***

Garrett and Anna woke up to a loud explosion.

“Oh, crap,” Garrett said, jumping out of bed. “Check the app on your phone.” He looked out the window. A barn was on fire, and another mortar round came down in the pasture, about half way between there and the house. He could see his men running with their weapons towards the west side of the property. Machine gun fire erupted.

“There’s nobody showing up on the apps,” Anna shouted. “Maybe it’s the UN.”

“Crap, how many of those jerks are around here?” Garrett yelled as he headed for the door, his long rifle in hand. “Get down in the basement.”

She nodded and followed him down the stairs. He went out the front door as she went into the basement. Another mortar round fell, closer to the house.

Sid, Yvonne, and Tyler rolled up in a Jeep, jumping out with weapons.

“They’re gonna hit the house if we don’t stop them fast,” Yvonne yelled.

“I see them,” Sid said, running forward as machine gun fire started up from their position. He dropped to the dirt and aimed his M60, spraying lead at the mortar team, killing most of them, one sprinting away, only to be dropped by Yvonne with her sniper rifle.

“Look at that old van,” Tyler said, aiming the M60 at it. He fired, cutting into the side. Suddenly all their phones buzzed. “Holy crap, there’s Islamists with chips back there.”

“Keep the pressure on,” Garrett yelled, firing his plains rifle as fast as he could load it, the massive .50 cal bullets smashing through the sides of the van. The Islamists were trying to escape out the side, but Sid was waiting, in a better position, killing them as they tried to run to the nearby oak trees for cover. After a moment there were no more gunshots. Sam and Erica drove up to the house, Erica rushing into it with Mia. Sam ran over to Garrett and the others.

“Where’s Mia?” Yvonne asked.

“Anna texted Erica to bring her to the basement,” Sam said. “Looks like you got them. Let’s go see how they hid themselves.”

“Looks to me like you were right,” Tyler said to Sid. “They’ve figured out how to shield their vehicles.”

The group moved cautiously towards the van, passing the ruined mortar and the men lying around it.

“Those are UN Peacekeepers,” Sam said, pointing to the bodies.

“I’ll check them,” Tyler said, rushing over. There was a single gunshot, startling everybody. Tyler rejoined the group. “One was still breathing.”

“Should have used a knife,” Garrett said as he led them to the van.

Sid snuck to the side door and looked inside. “They’re all dead. Look at this. They lined the inside of the van with lead.”

“The UN Peacekeepers were in the driver and passenger seat, since they don’t have chips,” Yvonne said. “And they brought the Islamists in the back. Why only these few? There might be more around.”

“My guys are on patrol again,” Garrett said, slipping his phone back in his pocket. “This is kinda peculiar.”

“This was a test,” Sam said. “We can expect a larger attack now, using this method. We need to have a meeting and figure out what we can do to protect ourselves.”

“I think I understand why you wouldn’t agree to killing the living off the road option,” Sid said.

To be continued…
 

Bug Out! California Book 3 – Rebellion has just been published, and is now available in the Kindle Store, free in Kindle Unlimited!

 

Bug Out! Texas 9 – Patriots Unleashed has just been published, and is now available in the Kindle Store, free in Kindle Unlimited!

 

Bug Out! California Book 2 – Resistance has just been published, and is now available in the Kindle Store, free in Kindle Unlimited!

 

Bug Out! California Book 1 is now available in the Kindle Store, free in Kindle Unlimited!

 

Bug Out! Texas Book 8 – West Border Mayhem is now available in the Kindle Store, free in Kindle Unlimited!

 

The Plan – How the Bugout! War Started is now available in the Kindle Store, free in Kindle Unlimited!

 

Bug Out! Texas Book 7 – Flood of Patriots – next in the series is now available in the Kindle store, free in Kindle Unlimited!

 

Bug Out! Texas Book 6 – Citizen Vengeance – next in the series is now available in the Kindle store, free in Kindle Unlimited!

 

Bug Out! Texas Book 5 – Wave of Patriots – next in the series is now available in the Kindle store, free in Kindle Unlimited!

 

Horror Road Book 4 – the latest in the series is now available in the Kindle store!

 

Bug Out! Texas Book 4 – Texas Battle Cry is now available in the Kindle store!

 

Bug Out! Texas Book 3 – Republic in Peril is now available in the Kindle store!

 

Bug Out! Texas Book 2 – The New Republic is now available in the Kindle Store. Pick up your copy of this exciting thriller today!

 

Bug Out! Texas has just been published in the Kindle Store! This is the story of Texas Patriots and their struggle against enemies, foreign and domestic, during the Bug Out! War. Chock full of action, adventure, suspense, and romance. Pick up your copy of Bug Out! Texas Book 1 today!

 

Please visit and like my author page on Facebook!

 

Here’s the series that started it all! Bug Out! Pick up your copy of book 1 for just 99 cents in the Kindle Store!

 

Horror Road – A Supernatural Thriller! Available now in the Kindle Store

 

The first of my full length novels has been published in the Amazon Kindle store, available now. For those of you have have been readying the Bugout! series, the story involves George and Malcolm, and is set about seven years earlier. This book R rated, instead of the PG-13 of the Bugout! Series, so be warned. Here’s the link to “Never A Loose End”

 

 

Copyright Robert Boren 2017

Bugout! California Part 132 – Bay Area Rampage

San Francisco was a battle zone. A battered Ford Excursion raced towards the pier.

“What are we doing on the Embarcadero?” Sanchez asked, worry on his black-bearded face. “It’s not a trap like last time, right? I’ve seen five UN vans since we left the restaurant.”

“Relax,” Joosten said. His hands were on the wheel of the SUV, his long gray hair shaggy, blowing in the wind of the open window. “We’re going to Pier 35. You really ought to be keeping track of the message boards. Hell, I’m old. You’re supposed to be more up on this crap than I am.”

“Why’d I have to come, anyway?”

“We’ve got a bunch of stuff to load into the back. Stan and Terry are following us, a couple blocks back, with their pick-up.”

“You believe this stuff too much,” Sanchez said. Joosten stared at him for a moment.

“Why are you with us?”

Sanchez was quiet for a moment. “Stan talked me into it.”

“If you don’t believe in this, don’t risk your life.”

“I’m in love with him,” Sanchez said.

“Duh. Why aren’t you riding with him, then?”

“He’s not as committed to the relationship as I am,” Sanchez said, eyes starting to tear up. “Why are you here? You’re too old to be running around with guns now.”

“I did just fine this morning,” Joosten said. “I haven’t given back enough. This country is worth fighting for.”

“This country has treated us badly,” Sanchez said.

“No, actually they haven’t. The Islamists who have been helping these globalist UN jerks like to throw us off buildings when they get control. Why do so many of us not see that as a problem? If we lose, they’ll be staying in our population, and growing in power. That’s death to people like us.”

A siren started up behind them. Sanchez turned around to look. “Police car. I thought they were all locked up.”

Joosten grinned. “Look, he’s chasing down that UN van. See it?”

“The guy in the passenger seat has his shotgun out,” Sanchez said. “Crap!”

The back door of the UN van opened, a man with an AK-47 aiming at the police cruiser. The Peacekeeper pulled the trigger, shooting the man in the passenger seat just as he fired, both men hit and killed. The vehicles swerved, the van hitting the curb and rolling into a building, the police cruiser slamming into the back of it.

“Whoa!” Joosten said, slamming on the brakes.

“What are you doing?” Sanchez yelled.

“I’m going to help,” he said, picking up his pistol from the center console. He rushed out in a crouch.

“Stay back,” the officer yelled, holding one arm. “The men in the front aren’t dead.”

“I’m armed, officer,” Joosten said as he rushed over. Sanchez got out and was heading for the area like nothing happened. Machine gun fire erupted, hitting Sanchez in the face and neck, killing him instantly.

“Dammit,” the officer said, looking back at Joosten, who had his pistol in a two-handed grip. He fired four times, hitting the UN Peacekeeper with the machine gun.

“Got the son of a bitch,” Joosten said.

“Nice,” the officer said. “Better get out of here.”

“Why?”

“Somebody tipped the UN off about the shipment. The vans are converging on the pier.”

“They going to Pier 35?”

The officer looked at him, shocked. “You’re in this.”

“Of course I’m in it,” Joosten said.

“Good,” the officer said. “Watch it. That guy’s running.”

Joosten got up, sprinting towards the police cruiser, grabbing the shot gun, and running forward. He fired twice, hitting the fleeing UN Peacekeeper before he could get behind cover.

“That can’t be all the folks in the van,” Joosten said.

“They’re cut real thin,” the officer said. “Help me to your vehicle. We need to get down to the pier.”

Joosten nodded, rushing over, helping him to his feet. The officer was six foot two, dark hair and dark eyes, pockmarked complexion.

“I’m Officer Barnett,” he said, as they rushed to the SUV, Joosten helping him into the passenger seat.

“Just a sec,” Joosten said, rushing over to the man he’d shot. He picked up his AK-47, and found two magazines in his pocket. He rushed back to the car with them, getting into the driver’s seat and setting them on Barnett’s lap. “You know how to fire these?”

“Yep,” Barnett said. “What’s your name?”

“Sorry – it’s Joosten.” He drove back onto Embarcadero, joining the traffic that was getting heavier by the minute.

“Holy crap, it’s working,” Barnett said.

“The social media campaign?”

“Yeah,” Barnett said. “That’s why you’re here, right?”

“Hell yeah. Think the shipment will really be there?”

“Ivan’s been right about everything so far,” Barnett said. “Hope the ship is there. I’ve heard that EU Destroyers were seen off the coast.”

“Really,” Joosten said, shooting him a worried glance. “If a lot of people get packed into that space and there’s no guns, we’re in trouble.”

“Tell me about it, man,” Barnett said.

“You have other officers coming?”

“Oh, yeah, pretty much the entire force has had it with the UN. There’s no elected officials in charge anywhere. The Police Commissioner has been in bed with them the entire time. Hope I get to shoot that son of a bitch.”

“What happened to your shoulder. Get shot?”

“No, that damn UN van in front of us stopped too quick, and I had my eyes on my partner for too long. Jammed myself into the steering wheel.”

“Oh,” Joosten said. “That ought to heal quick, at least.”

“Hell, chances are good neither of us will survive the night.”

Joosten glanced at him again, and shook his head in agreement.

“There’s the pier,” Barnett said. “The ship’s already there. Haul ass.”

“What, you want me to break the speed limit, officer?”

Barnett cracked up. “Damn straight.”

Joosten was already going as fast as he could, given the traffic. The area leading to the dock was clogged with cars, and people were already running away with armfuls of weapons and ammo, stuffing them into their cars and trucks, then going back for more. It was a crazy scene, people running back and forth, an occasional gun shot in the distance, then a blip of rat-a-tat-tat machine gun fire, echoing from between the buildings on Beach and North Point streets.

“What were you doing out here?” Joosten asked as they parked.

“Hunting UN vans. Hope the rest of the guys did better than we did, or this party is gonna be a blood bath.”

“Holy crap, what’s that thing?” Joosten asked, pointing at a large gun with an ammo belt hanging off it.

“Yes! They’re giving us M60s.”

“What’s that?” Joosten asked.

“Machine gun. Hell of a weapon.”

“Oh,” Joosten said. “I don’t think we can drive further. We need to get out. I got a wagon in the back.”

“Sounds good.”

“You need help out?”

“I already feel better,” Barnett said. “I’m shaking this off. We got some UN Peacekeepers to kill. I haven’t heard enough machine gun fire back there. That tells me that a lot of the UN vans got through.”

Suddenly there was a loud noise, and part of the pier 35 exploded.

“Dammit,” Barnett shouted. “C’mon.”

“You want to run towards that?”

“Yeah, before they destroy what’s left of the weapons,” Barnett said. “Look, it’s a EU Destroyer. It’s going to fire again.”

They both watched in horror as the cannons of the ship pointed towards the pier again, men on the cargo ship firing machine guns at them. The cannons fired, hitting the bridge of the ship, knocking it against the pier hard, as pieces of metal and men flew through the air.

“Dammit,” Barnett said. “Hurry. We’ve only got a couple minutes to grab weapons and hide. The UN vans will be here with reinforcements any second. This is why they weren’t here yet.”

“Hey, what’s that?” Joosten yelled, pointing at the water southeast of Pier 35. “Coming from Alameda. Is that the US Navy?”

“Wonder who’s side they’re on?” Barnett asked. Then the navy ship fired off several missiles, all of them hitting the EU ship in a split second, the boat blowing up in three places, thick black smoke coming off it as secondary explosions started.

“YES!” Joosten yelled. “They’re on our side.”

“Let’s get a couple of those M60s,” Barnett shouted, breaking into a run as the remaining crew of the cargo ship was tossing crates of weapons to the dock below, some of the boxes breaking open when they hit, others rolling and hitting the men waiting below. The scene was pandemonium. Somebody shouted “UN vans” at the top of his lungs, and suddenly there were a score of M60s pointed down the Embarcadero, firing at the UN vans and Peacekeepers on foot, causing them to flee for cover. The blood of the crowd was up, and nearly a hundred men ran down the street, ducking behind cover as the Peacekeepers fired, then returning much more fire, the M60s blowing right through cars the enemy troops were hiding behind.

“Let’s go get us some,” Barnett shouted, running as fast as he could now, M60 in both hands, AK-47 on a sling over his shoulder.

Joosten tried to keep up, then glanced down Bay Street to the right. “Officer, look, more UN vans coming down this street. Let’s nail ‘em.”

“I see them,” Barnett shouted. They both got into position and opened fire, lead smashing into the front windshields of the vans, men trying to get out and save themselves. Others from the pier saw what was going on and joined in, running down the street, firing M60s, M4s, and other weapons. Somebody tossed a grenade at several vans flying down the street towards them, catching the first two, the last hit by fire from half a dozen guns.

“Nailed their asses,” Joosten said. “This is almost fun.”

Barnett looked at him and smiled, then buckled to the ground as he was hit by fire from a window above.

“NO!!” shouted Joosten, rolling out of the way and aiming the heavy machine gun, firing through the window, others joining in, Peacekeepers falling from the windows.

Joosten rushed to Barnett’s side. “Where’re you hit?”

“All over,” Barnett whispered. “Go. Fight well. Show them what we’re made of.”

“Oh, no,” Joosten said, petting his forehead as he lost consciousness.

“Look, more coming north on Kearney Street,” somebody shouted.

Joosten kissed Barnett’s forehead, then took his ammo belt and the AK-47 and ran towards Kearney Street, his anger and passion taking him as he rejoined the battle, not stopping until the people had destroyed the enemy.

***

The phone dinged. Jules woke up startled, next to Shelly, their bodies sweaty against each other.

“What time is it?” Shelly asked as Jules looked at his phone.

“Nine thirty,” he said. “Text from Ivan. He says big action in San Francisco and Oakland. Enemy resources moving from Folsom to shore up Sacramento and Bay Area. He wants to hit prison in two hours.”

“Then we’d better get our butts moving,” Shelly said, reaching for her phone. “I’ll send out the text.”

“Do that,” Jules said. He replied to Ivan, then asked for more details. Ivan called him.

“Yes, boss?” Jules said. “On speaker.”

“Thought this would be faster than texting it,” Ivan said. “I trust you found the accommodations suitable.”

“They’re great,” Jules said. “We coming back here after?”

“Yes, probably, unless somebody gets followed there. We’ve had a wild evening.”

“What happened?”

“Ben Dover got the social media team up and running. We coordinated a shipment of weapons to Pier 35 in San Francisco, and a similar shipment into Oakland. People were already fighting in both places, but with inferior weapons.”

“How’d you get ship in there?”

Ivan chuckled. “We hijacked cargo ships. The EU Navy got wise, and followed. They attacked Pier 35, almost sunk the cargo ship at the dock. Lots of patriots died, I’m afraid.”

“But weapons transfer worked?”

“We had unexpected help,” Ivan said.

“Who?”

“US Navy ship from Alameda. Fired missiles, sank the EU Navy cruiser. They’re now guarding the area as our people attack. San Francisco is going to fall in a hurry. We’ve already taken north of I-80 and east of Fillmore Street.”

“That’s a quarter of the town,” Shelly said.

Ivan chuckled. “Yes. You know San Francisco, Milk Maid?”

“I do,” Shelly said, shooting a smirk at Jules, who shrugged back at her.

“It’s not quite a quarter, but we got the Financial District and City Hall. Large bunkers under City Hall held enemy offices. We could tell that it was vacated in a hurry. They didn’t expect an attack of this size.”

“But they did expect an attack?” Shelly asked.

“They sent a bunch of UN vans and a fair number of Peacekeepers on foot into the pier area, but they’d been fighting a smaller uprising between the Castro and Mission Districts. Their forces were tired and nearly out of ammo, and many had been shot in the earlier battle.”

“You think Daan’s headquarters were under City Hall?” Jules asked.

Ivan laughed. “We can’t tell yet. If so, that means he was only about five blocks from where I was.”

Jules cracked up. “That rich, boss.”

“Oh yeah, it is,” Ivan said. “But hey, back to business. We start some low-level trouble in Sacramento to draw forces from Folsom. We’re assembling a huge force near Sutter’s Landing along the American River, thanks to Ben Dover’s team again. Last number I saw was forty thousand citizens. We managed to get a large number of weapons into the area. Our forces should be getting them any minute now. We’ll start a small skirmish with part of the group in Midtown, just to make sure the slugs send a lot of Peacekeepers there.”

“You give nasty surprise, no?”

“You got it,” Ivan said. “We’ve had people watching Highway 50. There are forces already leaving the Folsom area. Since we took San Francisco City Hall and are storming Oakland City Hall as we speak, they’ll see any activity near the State Capitol area as an imminent threat. We expect them to send most of their forces from Folsom to help out.”

“We got anyone inside?” Shelly asked.

“Yeah, some guards, who’ve been reduced to working in the kitchen and outside the prison since the UN Peacekeepers took over. Those they didn’t kill, of course.”

“Bastards,” Jules said.

“Yes,” Ivan said. “Do you anticipate any problems with leaving in the next half hour?”

“Get responses back?” Jules asked Shelly.

“Yep, all the principals replied, and a whole lot of the off-roader team. Are we bringing all of them?”

“Might as well,” Ivan said. “Use the M19s to break into the building, on the off-roaders and the battle wagons.”

“We be assault team at prison too?” Jules asked.

“Part of it,” Ivan said. “Mr. White and Mr. Black will be there with their commandos.”

“Excellent,” Jules said. “I admire their work. Anything else?”

“If you can’t make it there within two hours for any reason, text me right away. Got it?”

“I got, chief,” Jules said. “Talk soon.”

The call ended.

“We’d better get dressed,” Shelly said.

“Yes,” Jules said. They could hear people outside rushing about. “You tell what Ivan said in text?”

“Enough of it to get them going,” Shelly said, as she pulled on her shirt.

***

Saladin woke up to workmen rushing around outside of his chambers. He got up and checked the time, on the way out into Daan’s living space. It was just after midnight.

“What’s going on?” Saladin asked one of the workers, who was boxing up the bar.

“Boss said we leave,” the man said in a Belgian accent. “He says tell you to pack stuff.”

“Why?”

“He didn’t say. In next room. Be back in moment.”

Saladin paced the room, then ducked into his chambers and put his few personal items into a carry-on suitcase. Daan was back when he rolled it out.

“What’s happening?” Saladin asked.

“We’re in the process of losing San Francisco, and Oakland is under a massive attack. It’s starting to spread into Berkley to the north and Hayward to the south.”

“Who? Ivan’s people?” Saladin asked.

“Citizens,” Daan said.

“You giving up? Because I’m not. I’ll crush the infidel. We’ve got a lot of capability. We’ll have I-8 open again soon.”

“I’m not giving up,” Daan said, “but I know when it’s time to regroup and re-prioritize.”

“Where’s all these UN Peacekeepers who were supposed to show up?”

“There’s three ships on the way, but it’s only sixty thousand men. Not enough compared to the number of citizens who are in the fight now.”

“That’s a good number. I could do a lot with that many men. I could control this puny peninsula, for example.”

Daan chuckled. “You don’t get it. There are more than half a million armed citizens in the Bay Area battle. We’re not landing the UN Peacekeepers here. We’re taking them further north.”

Saladin laughed. “These folks just have hunting guns, don’t they? You can’t take them on with military weapons and tactics?”

“Somebody is flooding the area with real weapons. M60s and M4 variants. RPGs. Grenade launchers. Hell, even TOW Missiles.”

“Ivan?” Saladin asked.

“Well, if it’s Ivan, he’s got a hell of a lot of rich friends,” Daan said.

“We’ve got two hundred thousand Islamic Fighters heading south right now. Want me to recall them?”

“No, I want you to get I-8 and the other roads down there opened up, so the seven hundred thousand fighters in Mexico can come in and help. That’s your task. Think you can handle it?”

“Yes, Daan, I can handle it,” Saladin said. “What about Capitol Reef? What about General Hogan’s forces?”

“Later. We can’t write off California. Not yet, anyway.”

Daan picked up a packet of papers and headed for the door. “My people will get you out of here. There’s a chopper coming. You’ll get onto the building next door – roof pickup.”

“Are you going that way too?”

“No, I’m getting onto a ship, taking it up to Oregon. Then I’ll be meeting with the EU leadership, so I’ll be out of the country for a while.”

“You’re going back to Belgium?”

“Just for the meeting,” Daan said. “The UN wants to pull out of California and still retain EU funding. I’m going there to make sure it doesn’t happen.”

Saladin laughed. “Then your job is probably more difficult than mine. Good luck to you. Thanks for the hospitality.”

Daan nodded and rushed out the door. Saladin sat down and pulled his cellphone out. Where are my forces now? He checked his command and control app. They were just south of Fresno, heading south on Highway 99.

To be continued…

 

Bug Out! Texas 9 – Patriots Unleashed has just been published, and is now available in the Kindle Store, free in Kindle Unlimited!

 

Bug Out! California Book 2 – Resistance has just been published, and is now available in the Kindle Store, free in Kindle Unlimited!

 

Bug Out! California Book 1 is now available in the Kindle Store, free in Kindle Unlimited!

 

Bug Out! Texas Book 8 – West Border Mayhem is now available in the Kindle Store, free in Kindle Unlimited!

 

The Plan – How the Bugout! War Started is now available in the Kindle Store, free in Kindle Unlimited!

 

Bug Out! Texas Book 7 – Flood of Patriots – next in the series is now available in the Kindle store, free in Kindle Unlimited!

 

Bug Out! Texas Book 6 – Citizen Vengeance – next in the series is now available in the Kindle store, free in Kindle Unlimited!

 

Bug Out! Texas Book 5 – Wave of Patriots – next in the series is now available in the Kindle store, free in Kindle Unlimited!

 

Horror Road Book 4 – the latest in the series is now available in the Kindle store!

 

Bug Out! Texas Book 4 – Texas Battle Cry is now available in the Kindle store!

 

Bug Out! Texas Book 3 – Republic in Peril is now available in the Kindle store!

 

Bug Out! Texas Book 2 – The New Republic is now available in the Kindle Store. Pick up your copy of this exciting thriller today!

 

Bug Out! Texas has just been published in the Kindle Store! This is the story of Texas Patriots and their struggle against enemies, foreign and domestic, during the Bug Out! War. Chock full of action, adventure, suspense, and romance. Pick up your copy of Bug Out! Texas Book 1 today!

 

Please visit and like my author page on Facebook!

 

Here’s the series that started it all! Bug Out! Pick up your copy of book 1 for just 99 cents in the Kindle Store!

 

Horror Road – A Supernatural Thriller! Available now in the Kindle Store

 

The first of my full length novels has been published in the Amazon Kindle store, available now. For those of you have have been readying the Bugout! series, the story involves George and Malcolm, and is set about seven years earlier. This book R rated, instead of the PG-13 of the Bugout! Series, so be warned. Here’s the link to “Never A Loose End”

 

 

Copyright Robert Boren 2017

Bugout! California Part 131 – Treasure

Jules and Shelly came out of their rig, helping their passengers. Then they joined the others, who were milling around in front of the row of six battle wagons. The armed off-roaders and Jeeps were still coming in, parking where they could find spaces.

“Is this a short-term base or a long-term base?” Sparky asked, coming out of the rig with Dana.

“Depend on what you mean by short term and long term,” Jules said.

“Anything more than a few days is long term now,” Dana said.

Where’s everybody going to sleep?” Shelly asked.

“See building over to far right?” Jules asked. “Ivan bring in cots, food, other stuff.”

Looks like the flow of off-roaders is about done,” Sparky said.

“There a few around outside the facility,” Jules said. “Just in case. Early warning.”

“I can’t believe they don’t know where we are,” Shelly said under her breath.

“Video viral on internet,” Jules said.

“The TV show?” Shelly asked.

“Yes,” Jules said. “Heard from Ivan. People begin to self-organize. Anxious to browse net and look. He thinks game changes now.”

“Well, I hope he’s right,” Sparky said. “When’s the next attack?”

“We have meeting later tonight,” Jules said. “Soon.”

“Are we coming back here afterwards?” Shelly asked.

“If possible, yes,” Jules said. “Depend on outcome and what citizens do. Alternate site available, as good as this.”

“What are we expecting from the citizens?” Sparky asked.

“Ben Dover’s started social media blitz right after TV broadcast. Ivan say response greater than expected. Much greater.”

“Well, maybe we should get the sleeping area ready,” Dana said. “The hostages have got to be tired. They could use showers, too. Are there facilities for that here?”

“Should be,” Jules said. He looked at Shelly. “Should we go help?”

“No,” Shelly said. “I want to talk to you about something. In the coach, okay?”

“No problem,” Sparky said. “I’ll go with Dana. We can get things set up.”

“Thanks,” Jules said. He watched Sparky and Dana walk away hand in hand, then followed Shelly into their coach.

“Shut the door, sweetie, and lock it.”

“Lock?” Jules asked.

“Yes,” she said from the back.

“Okay,” Jules said. “Where you go?”

“Back here.” He walked back there, pausing to take off his shoes, his feet hot and tired from the action and the drive. He froze when he got into the bedroom. Shelly was sitting on the bed naked, watching him with serious eyes.

“Oh,” he said. “You need?”

“I’m scared,” she said. “Get your clothes off.”

He nodded, not sure if he should be happy or worried, his heart beating hard in his chest.

“Good, it’s not just me,” she said, looking at his lack of the usual condition.

“You worry me,” he said. “Not worry, desire still strong. You?”

“Telling my story,” she said, starting to cry. “I didn’t think it would get to me. Listening to the others was even harder. We don’t discuss it together. That was the first time most of us spoke about it since you saved us.”

“Maybe we shouldn’t. Let’s just cuddle for a while. Rest and comfort each other.”

“No, I want you to take me hard. Make me feel it. Break through this. I can’t let it sit. It’ll become a thing.

“You sure?”

“Yes. I need to feel that I’m yours, and that you cherish me above everything.” She stood, taking him into her arms. The feeling was enough to get Jules excited.

“Finally,” he whispered to himself.

“I feel it,” she said, backing away to look at him. “I meant it. Hard. Take your woman.”

He picked her up and set her on the bed, taking his time with her as she writhed below him.

“Now,” she said. “C’mon.”

“No, I take the way I want, woman,” he said, keeping up the slow, tantalizing foreplay with her. By the time they joined she was fever hot, screaming with passion as he let himself go, moving her from one position to another, but not getting enough of her. Eye contact was what he craved, and he rolled on top of her, his face inches from hers as he moved, watching her eyes as she gave in totally, as passionate as he’d ever seen her.

“Jules,” she whispered.

“Yes,” he panted.

“This is a bad time.”

“What mean?” he asked, still on the ragged edge of self-control, slowing slightly.

“Baby,” she whispered.

“Oh, then I be careful,” he said, speeding up again.

“Jules?”

He looked at her, almost at his peak, feeling the control leaving him.

“Be careful,” she whispered, looking at him, her eyes a mixture of fear and… naughtiness, which drove him over the top. He tried to pull away, but her legs locked him against her, keeping him there as the passion consumed both of them.

“Uh oh,” Jules whispered, looking at her, worry in his eyes. She pushed him up so she could look at his whole face.

“You probably just got me pregnant,” she said, half a smile on her face.

“I’m sorry,” he said.

“It’s what I wanted.”

“We talk about, you said no,” Jules said, searching her eyes.

“You’re my man, and I needed what I needed,” she said. “I didn’t want to discuss it. Now get off me and grab one of those pillows.”

He looked at her for a moment, eyes questioning, then got up. She grabbed her legs, pulling them up against her torso, elevating her lower body.

“What you do?” he asked as he got a pillow out from under the bedspread.

“Put it under my butt,” she said. “I want to help things along.”

Jules smiled, doing as she requested, then lying on the bed next to her. “This not expected.”

“War and terror aren’t the important things in life,” she said, turning her head towards him. “This is. I’ll never leave you. I want at least three children. You gonna be able to handle that?”

He chuckled. “I wanted to start later, but if you need now, you need.” He looked at her, and a mischievous grin came over his face.

“What?” she asked.

“Who say only three?”

***

Sam was sitting on the coach in his battle wagon. Erica walked out from the back.

“She asleep?”

Erica nodded yes. “I think she feels safer here.”

“How could she know?”

Erica sat next to him. “She’s very sensitive. She probably picks up on our feelings.”

“Oh,” Sam said. “That makes sense. How are you doing?”

“I’m having a hard time coming down from that last battle,” she said, leaning against him. “When I saw those UN Peacekeepers all over the clearing in front of the house, I just about went crazy.”

“You did,” Sam said, putting his arm on her shoulders and pulling her closer. “I had the same thing going on inside.”

“I know,” she whispered. “If anything happened to Mia I’d never recover.”

“Yes, you would,” Sam said. “Look what she went through before we got her. Americans have been lucky. There hasn’t been a situation like this since the Civil War. I used to wonder how the citizens would be if we were thrust into a wartime situation, like the Europeans were during the world wars. Our people are strong, with a tradition of liberty that’s ingrained. This is horrible to live through, but we’ll win.”

“That wasn’t your attitude a few days ago,” Erica said. “What changed your mind? Can’t be that last battle. We almost lost that.”

“Garrett and I had a talk while I was driving. It was when you and Anna were talking with the others in back.”

“What’d he say?”

Sam chuckled. “He reminded me that we have over forty million people in this state, and most of them are on our side. Our people will never be subjugated, but there will be awful battles ahead.”

“Oh,” Erica said. “I get it. That’s big-picture, though. We’re in the thick of things, being hunted because of the damage we’ve done. The people might never lose the state, but we might not be around to see the victory.”

“That’s true,” Sam said, “but we’re pretty fast on our feet, and we’ve got good leadership. Our people are brave, and we stick together. Most of us will probably survive this.”

“I hope you’re right,” Erica said.

There was a knock at the door.

“I got it,” Sam said, getting up. Garrett and Ed were standing outside with Tyler, Seth, and Angel.

“Hey, guys,” Sam said, standing aside.

“Why don’t you guys go talk elsewhere,” Erica said. “Mia needs a good night’s sleep.”

“Then you can’t listen,” Sam said

“No problem, you’ll tell me all about it later. Go. Plan well. I’ll keep guard over our little girl.”

Sam nodded, coming over to kiss her forehead, then grabbing his gun and coming out. He closed the door quietly. “Well, where too?”

“Saloon,” Garrett said. “Ryan and Sid are gonna show up, and a few others.”

“The saloon it is,” Sam said. “They got any whiskey left?”

“Yeah,” Garrett said. “We’ve actually been making our own. Never mentioned that. It’s not exactly legal.”

“We aren’t drinking much, though, right?” Sid asked.

“Oh, a slug or two won’t hurt,” Garrett said. “There’s still some of that old stuff left.”

The men walked towards the western street, getting onto the wood sidewalk.

“This is something,” Tyler said.

“Oh, it’s silliness, but we like it,” Garrett said. “We’ve been trying to immerse ourselves in more romantic times.”

Ed chuckled. “We’re in romantic times now.”

“Historic,” Seth said.

Ji-Ho saw them coming. He was leaning against the front of the Saloon, smiling at them. Ryan was next to him, and Trevor. Clem walked over after a minute.

“Where are all the women?” Sam asked. “Is this boy’s night out?”

“They’re getting the grand tour of the place from Garrett’s sister,” Trevor said.

“Good,” Garrett said. “Knowing Susanne, they’ll all get jobs.”

“That should go for us men-folk as well,” Ed said.

“Yes,” Ji-Ho said. “We all do part.”

“Some of those women are scary good warriors,” Seth said. “Mine, for example, and Erica too.”

“Megan’s probably better than I am,” Angel said, “at least at some things.”

They filed into the saloon, the swinging doors flapping as they walked in. Crusty old Willard saw them and grinned ear to ear. He looked down at the floor behind the bar and spit, the wet plug of tobacco hitting the spittoon there with a splat.

“Howdy,” he said, smoothing his beard. “What can I do you for?”

“We still got some of the good stuff?” Garrett asked.

“Hell yeah,” Willard said. “Okay if I join you?”

“Wouldn’t have it any other way,” Garrett said. The men picked a large round table, pulling out chairs and sitting. Willard brought over glasses and a couple bottles of whiskey, so old that the labels were disintegrating.

“You were waiting for us,” Sam said to Ji-Ho.

“Yes,” he said, smiling as he watched Willard pour whiskey into his glass. He tossed it back, looking around the western saloon with its 19th century artwork, the ornate shelving behind the bar, and the spittoons every few feet. “This great. Need cowboy hat.”

Garrett laughed. “That can be arranged.”

“You heard from Ivan,” Ed said.

“Yes,” Ji-Ho said, sliding his empty glass towards Willard. “Hit me again, partner.”

Willard and Garrett burst out laughing, the others looking on with smiles. Ji-Ho grinned as Willard poured, and knocked back the drink.

“Video of captive women testimony go viral,” Ji-Ho said. “Ivan hit with recruitment effort at same time, using technique from Texas group. Street battle in San Francisco and Oakland on now. Authorities losing.”

“Which authorities?” Sid asked. “The police?”

Seth chuckled. “No, the police are on our side.”

“You know?” Ji-Ho asked.

“I’ve been on social media for the past few hours. Finally had to plug in my tablet. Ran it out of juice.”

“You didn’t say right off?” Ji-Ho asked.

“Figured I’d let you talk,” Seth said. “I’m seeing something the whole damn population has access to. You, on the other hand, have a direct line into command central.”

“Is Ivan still with Jules, Sparky, and Ted?” Sam asked.

“They split up,” Ji-Ho said. “Next mission coming soon, will put California elected officials back in power.”

“For better or for worse,” Clem said.

“Maybe some learn lesson,” Ji-Ho said. “Biggest liberal in state of Texas now best friends with Governor Nelson, who’s far to conservative side. We bury the hatchet and fight together.”

Sam snickered. “Yep, and when the fight is over, we’ll go right back to arguing with each other.”

“But with memory of this,” Ji-Ho said. “Wrong on both sides. Wrong to place foreigners above home country. Done by both sides. Chamber of commerce want cheap labor. Left want future voters.”

“We’re gonna have war in Europe again,” Trevor said. “I’m going to sit it out.”

“The kid’s probably right about that,” Sam said. “Ivan’s been sowing the seeds of revolution via social media to his counterparts.”

“Counterparts?” Angel asked.

“Resistance in EU,” Ji-Ho said. “Against globalists.”

“They’ve got problems on a scale that we aren’t even near,” Sam said. “Most of those countries have more foreigners than natives now.”

“From what I’ve been reading, their radical Islam problem has gotten better,” Seth said.

“It has?” Sid asked.

Ji-Ho chuckled. “You know why. They send many Islamist fighters here, and more than half come from Europe, not Middle East.”

“They thought Europeans and Americans are a lot alike,” Garrett said, leaning back in his chair with a grin. “I doubt many of them think that now.”

“Where are they actually winning, anyway?” Trevor asked.

“New England and the Mid-Atlantic, according to the message boards,” Seth said. “There’s still martial law there that’s being enforced. There’s some rebellion, but nothing on the scale we’re seeing here.”

“I expected martial law to be more successful here,” Garrett said. “The citizens of California have been surprising, and in a good way.”

“You got that right,” Sam said.

“What are we doing next?” Angel asked. “Are we gonna focus on fortification of this place, or are we gonna stage another attack?”

“Both,” Ji-Ho said, “but details still need to be worked out on next attack. There’s been movement.”

“I was just going to bring that up,” Garrett said. “I’m still seeing a flow of Islamists coming down from Julian.”

“Does it look like they’re coming here yet?” Angel asked.

“They haven’t gone south of Descanso yet,” Garrett said. “Some of them seem to be disappearing. Maybe they’ve built some underground facilities.”

“Or maybe they’re using something natural,” Sam said, “caves, like Saladin’s main forces are doing in Capitol Reef.”

“That may be diversion,” Ji-Ho said. “General Hogan working.”

Trevor’s face changed, and he brought his phone to his face, looking at the screen.

“What, man?” Seth asked.

“Maybe they figured out that we can see them,” Trevor said. “Actually, how could they not know? Think about it.”

“What made you bring up?” Ji-Ho asked, “and why you study apps?”

“I’m not studying the apps, I’m looking at the web, to see if there are any good-sized caves or mines around Descanso or Julian.”

“You don’t think they’re taking the chips out, do you?” Tyler asked.

“Dammit,” Sam said under his breath.

“Wait,” Sid said. “Think they could figure out a way to shield themselves?”

“What do you mean?” Sam asked.

“Say they could line their vans with something that would stop the signal of the RFID chips.”

“That good question,” Ji-Ho said.

“This reminds me of something we were talking about earlier,” Sam said. “Seth, think you could develop some metrics based on the RFID hits over time?”

“Yeah, we were talking about that when we were driving here,” Garrett said.

Seth thought about it for a moment. “Yeah, I could do that, but it would only show us data going forward. It’ll take a while for it to do us much good.”

“I like,” Ji-Ho said. “If they shield and move, we catch them with historic data. We see chips disappear and re-appear.”

“I’ll start working it tonight,” Seth said.

“You’ve had a long day,” Sam said. “Maybe you ought to start in the morning.”

“I’ve got ideas,” Seth said. “I won’t be able to sleep until I work them. You guys need me for anything? If not, I’m going back to my rig to get on the laptop.”

“Go ahead,” Ji-Ho said. “Figure out. Very important.”

“Yeah, dude, I’ll fill you in on what happened here,” Angel said.

Seth got up, nodded to the group, and left.

“Those apps are gonna go wide pretty soon no matter what, right?” Sam asked.

“Yes, will,” Ji-Ho said. “Soon.”

“Soon like tomorrow?” Garrett asked.

“Soon like this month,” Ji-Ho said.

“Geez,” Ryan said. “This isn’t great. We already know the UN is out there with no tracking devices, and now the Islamists might be able to hide themselves too? Didn’t we just say we were winning?”

“Yes, we still winning,” Ji-Ho said. “Enemy lost war for hearts and minds. No way to recover.”

“You don’t think we’re out of the woods yet, though, do you?” Sam asked, eyeing him.

“Bad problems in Arizona, Utah, Colorado. Texas have massive cleanup job, nearly million fighters there. New England and Mid Atlantic not liberated. All hard. Citizens key to win battle, but other danger.”

“What other danger?” Ed asked.

“Government at all levels infested. Elected and un-elected enemy actors. Chip app release with names get many. Others who not on insider level survive, make trouble. Deep State. Very bad.”

“I thought they were already targeting people using the name capability,” Sam said.

“Still be battle,” Ji-Ho said. “Hide, destroy documents, make up stories, kill witnesses. Turmoil on level never seen. Bumpy ride.”

“You guys aren’t getting hammered, are you?” Susanne asked in her raspy voice, coming into the saloon with Kaylee, Megan, Kaitlyn, Yvonne, and others. She turned to them. “See, told you they’d be in the saloon.”

Several of the women snickered.

“Looks like the party’s over,” Ed said, trying to keep a straight face.

“Hey, sis, come on over and have a drink,” Garrett said, holding up the bottle.

“Land sakes, you guys are drinking up the best stuff. We’re gonna run out soon.” She walked over and watched as Willard poured her one, drinking it down without a shudder. “Damn that’s good. You girls want some of this? Get it while it’s still here.”

“I’d rather just go back to our rig,” Kaitlyn said, looking around the room. “Hey, where’s Seth?”

“He’s on special assignment,” Angel quipped.

“Dangerous?” she asked.

“No, computer work,” Sam said. “Don’t worry.”

“I’m going over there, then,” Kaitlyn said, walking out the door.

“You coming?” Kaylee asked Trevor. He shook his head yes and joined her, the other men joining their women too.

“I tired, retire,” Ji-Ho said. “Don’t get discouraged. We win. Trust me.”

“I know,” Garrett said. Ji-Ho walked out the door.

“More old goats, just what we need,” Susanne muttered under her breath.

“C’mon, Sis, don’t you have a date with Elmer?” Garrett asked.

“That old fool,” she asked. “I kicked him to the curb again last night.”

“Why?”

“He wouldn’t leave me alone,” she said. “Thinks I’m scared or something.”

“That’ll last another twenty minutes,” Garrett cracked.

“Shut up,” she said, turning to leave. “Don’t stay up too late, and don’t drink up all of the good stuff.”

The remaining men watched her walk out. As soon as she was out of sight, Willard grinned.

“What now?” Garrett asked him. “I’ve seen that look before.”

“Found something when I was trying to rig up new lights in the mine,” he said.

“What’s that?” Sam asked.

He nodded to the back of the bar, and started walking in that direction, the others following. They went into the storage room, Willard unlocking a padlock on a door to the right. He pushed the door open and pulled the chain to turn the light on.

“Is that what I think it is?” Garrett asked, going inside to look at five wooden crates.

“It’s mostly not whiskey,” Willard said. “Brandy, gin, and rum.”

“This crate says whiskey,” Garrett said.

“Oh, yeah, there’s probably more whiskey than we had before, or pretty damn close,” Willard said. “Most of it’s still in the mine.”

“Damn, brother, how much did you find down there?” Garrett asked.

“Fifty-two cases like this, and some loose bottles,” he said. “Also some mixers and some champagne, but that’s all bad now.”

“Geez,” Sam said.

“Maybe we shouldn’t tell Susanne about it,” Willard said. “She’ll start rationing.”

“You tell Elmer yet?” Garrett asked.

“Yeah, he helped me carry it out here.”

Garrett shook his head. “She’ll know about it by morning.”

“I thought they broke up?” Ed asked.

Garrett chuckled. “Yeah, for the umpteenth time. They’ll wake up next to each other. Trust me.”

The door behind them opened. “Hey, what’s going on?”

“Hey, Elmer, just talking about you,” Willard said. “You still on the outs with Susanne?”

“No, but she thinks we are,” he said, grinning. “She wasn’t at her house a while ago. Seen her?”

“She left here five minutes ago,” Garrett said. “Willard just gave her a snort. You might want to go take advantage.”

“Okay, I’d best be going,” he said, turning towards the door.

“Elmer,” Willard called out.

“Yeah,” he said, turning back.

“You know all this booze probably got hid from somebody like Susanne, right?”

He snickered. “You always think I tell her everything. Good night.”

“She’ll know by morning,” Garrett said, big grin on his face.

“Yeah, you know it’s true,” Willard said.

To be continued…

 

Bug Out! Texas 9 – Patriots Unleashed has just been published, and is now available in the Kindle Store, free in Kindle Unlimited!

 

Bug Out! California Book 2 – Resistance has just been published, and is now available in the Kindle Store, free in Kindle Unlimited!

 

Bug Out! California Book 1 is now available in the Kindle Store, free in Kindle Unlimited!

 

Bug Out! Texas Book 8 – West Border Mayhem is now available in the Kindle Store, free in Kindle Unlimited!

 

The Plan – How the Bugout! War Started is now available in the Kindle Store, free in Kindle Unlimited!

 

Bug Out! Texas Book 7 – Flood of Patriots – next in the series is now available in the Kindle store, free in Kindle Unlimited!

 

Bug Out! Texas Book 6 – Citizen Vengeance – next in the series is now available in the Kindle store, free in Kindle Unlimited!

 

Bug Out! Texas Book 5 – Wave of Patriots – next in the series is now available in the Kindle store, free in Kindle Unlimited!

 

Horror Road Book 4 – the latest in the series is now available in the Kindle store!

 

Bug Out! Texas Book 4 – Texas Battle Cry is now available in the Kindle store!

 

Bug Out! Texas Book 3 – Republic in Peril is now available in the Kindle store!

 

Bug Out! Texas Book 2 – The New Republic is now available in the Kindle Store. Pick up your copy of this exciting thriller today!

 

Bug Out! Texas has just been published in the Kindle Store! This is the story of Texas Patriots and their struggle against enemies, foreign and domestic, during the Bug Out! War. Chock full of action, adventure, suspense, and romance. Pick up your copy of Bug Out! Texas Book 1 today!

 

Please visit and like my author page on Facebook!

 

Here’s the series that started it all! Bug Out! Pick up your copy of book 1 for just 99 cents in the Kindle Store!

 

Horror Road – A Supernatural Thriller! Available now in the Kindle Store

 

The first of my full length novels has been published in the Amazon Kindle store, available now. For those of you have have been readying the Bugout! series, the story involves George and Malcolm, and is set about seven years earlier. This book R rated, instead of the PG-13 of the Bugout! Series, so be warned. Here’s the link to “Never A Loose End”

 

 

Copyright Robert Boren 2017

Bugout! California Part 130 – Travel Night

Tex drove the rig, following Jules, the rest of the rigs behind him. Karen was in the passenger seat.

“Jules is getting off here,” Karen said.

“Yeah, North Shingle Road,” Tex said. “We’ll have to go over the freeway to get on it.”

“Wonder how safe this place is gonna be?” Karen asked.

“We’ll see,” Tex said.  “Ivan and Jules say it’s safe. They’re usually right.”

“Except at the communications installation that we hit,” Karen said.

“What happened there?” asked Samantha, walking to the front of the coach.

“Hold on, little lady,” Tex said, “making a turn and it’s sharp.” He took the off ramp, following the curves and getting onto the bridge over Highway 50. Samantha held onto the backs of the two seats.

“There’s your road, honey,” Karen said, pointing.

“Right turn,” Tex said. “Hold on again. Then it should be better for a while.”

Samantha nodded, her blonde hair swaying as she braced herself. Tex made the turn and slowly sped up on North Shingle.

“There we go,” Karen said. “This goes up into the hills, huh?”

“Looks that way,” Tex said.

“What were you talking about again?” Samantha asked. “The communications system?”

“That was an earlier mission,” Karen said. “We went into a remote area to take out an enemy communications center.”

“It went badly?”

“We lost a couple people there due to some tanks we didn’t know about,” Tex said. “It was a tough day.”

“Oh,” Samantha said. “You mostly survived, though, from the look of it.”

“Yeah, we were able to knock out the tanks with TOW missiles,” Tex said. “We were lucky.”

“Ivan didn’t know the tanks were there, did he?” Samantha asked.

“Nope,” Tex said, “but I wouldn’t be too hard on him for that. The tanks had been placed there a couple months before we knew about the target, and they were well hidden. We didn’t have good enough assets on the ground to find them.”

“What about this place we’re going to?” Samantha asked. “Should we be worried.”

“This is war, so we always have to be worried,” Tex said, “but this is a different situation entirely.”

“Different how?”

Karen looked back at Samantha. “We’re going to a rebel base, not an enemy base, for one thing.”

“Oh,” she said. “Okay, but what if the enemy knows about this place?”

“We’ll fight them,” Tex said. “We hurt them badly over the last twenty-four hours, though. They don’t have the resources to find us easily, without a real lucky break.”

“These rigs and all those armed off-roaders are gonna be seen. It’s almost light.”

“Yeah, but we’d have to be seen by people who are siding with the UN and the Islamists, and there aren’t many of those.”

“Wait till our TV show gets on air,” Karen said.

“It was broadcast late last night,” Tex said.

“It was?” Samantha asked.

“Yeah, that’s why Ivan went to a different spot,” Tex said. “We’ve got these creeps on the run.”

Karen picked up her phone and checked the internet. “Wow, it’s viral.”

“Really?” Samantha asked.

“Ivan’s got a pretty big following, plus he always busts onto all channels when he first does these,” Karen said.

Tex watched the dark terrain ahead of the coach. “Gets remote on this road pretty fast.”

“Lots of roads going off on either side, though,” Karen said. “I’ll bet there’s lots of rich people living around here. Lots of compounds.”

“That’s where we’re going, I suspect,” Tex said.

“You haven’t been told exactly where yet?” Samantha asked.

“Loose lips sink ships,” Tex said. “If somebody breaks down or gets captured, we don’t want them to know our next destination.”

“Oh, I get it,” Samantha said.

Tex and Karen’s phones dinged.

“What’s that?” Samantha asked. “Text messages?”

“Probably a broadcast, little lady. Next turn, or even destination.”

Karen read the message. “From Shelly. Shingle Springs road turns into Green Valley at a curve to the right. Keep on it. Then there’s a slight curve to the left, and Green Valley makes a sharp right turn. Don’t take that right turn. Keep going straight. The road turns into Lotus Road. We’ll take Lotus to Lisa Lane, which is to the right.”

“That’s the destination?” Tex asked.

“Sounds like it,” she said, bringing up her map app. “Hmmm. Large compound in front of a massive rock quarry.”

“Interesting,” Tex said. “I don’t think we’ll be there long. Sounds like Ivan wants to hit Folsom while the iron is hot.”

“Yeah,” Karen said.

“When do I find out if I can join up?” Samantha asked.

“That’ll be up to Jules, I suspect,” Tex said.

“Did all the women who were rescued from the Torrance location join?”

Karen looked back at her. “No, but most did. I was surprised.”

“How many didn’t?” Samantha asked.

“Shoot, I’ll have to think about that a little,” Karen said. “Seems like eons ago.”

“We got the under-age girls back to their relatives,” Tex said.

“There were under-age girls at your detention center?” Samantha asked, shooting a shocked look at Karen.

“These people are pigs,” Karen said, “but you already knew that. There weren’t under-aged captives where you were?”

“They just grabbed me about two weeks ago. I was with a group of six women that got nabbed from a shopping center.”

“You were shopping there?” Tex asked.

“No, I was a clerk in the anchor department store. They lined us all up. Took the pretty women. Left the rest. Killed the men working there.”

“I’m surprised they didn’t kill the women they left behind too,” Tex said.

“The men were killed because they tried to protect us,” Samantha said as she fought back tears. “One of them was my boyfriend.”

“I’m so sorry,” Karen said softly.

“You went through worse,” she said. “They killed your parents in front of you.”

“We’ve all been through bad stuff,” Karen said. “Focus on survival and victory. That’s what keeps me going. That and this big lug in the driver’s seat.”

“You’ve been together for a while?”

Karen chuckled. “I played hard to get. Didn’t last long.”

“Oh, it lasted a while,” Tex said.

“You were persistent,” Karen said. “You won me over.’

“Most of the women are paired up,” Samantha said. “That’s kinda weird.”

“Not really, when you think about it,” Karen said.

“The war?” Samantha asked.

“Yeah, that’s part of it,” Karen said. “I wouldn’t have spent enough time with Tex for him to win me over if we weren’t kinda forced together.”

Tex chuckled. “Don’t underestimate me. I would have been after you no matter the situation.”

“Oh, you’re probably right, I guess,” Karen said. “You are my type, but I didn’t recognize it at first. I thought you were nuts when I first met you.”

“I am a little nuts,” Tex said, shooting her a grin.

“Yeah, but in a good way,” Karen said.

“Wonder how many of these wartime romances will last after the war’s over?” Samantha asked.

“Who knows,” Karen said. “I think Tex and I will be together forever, but people usually think that. I’m hopeful. I’m very much in love with him.”

“Likewise, honey,” Tex said.

“Nobody’s broken up since you’ve been a team?” Samantha asked.

“Nope,” Tex said. “Two of the couples just recently got together.”

“Two? I thought it was only Ted and Haley. Everybody else has been together for a while.”

“Sparky and Dana,” Tex said. “Sparky resisted. Dana was clingy, and he wasn’t sure if she was really in love with him or not. They worked through that, about the same time that Ted and Haley got together.”

“I don’t look at it that way exactly,” Karen said, “after talking to Dana a lot. She’s got problems, though.”

“Problems?” Samantha asked.

“PTSD,” Karen said, “night terrors.”

“Oh. Surprised all of you don’t have that.”

“How about you?” Karen asked Samantha. “Having problems?”

“I have no idea,” she said. “Remember that I just got out of captivity. My mind is still focused on survival. My mind keeps telling me I’ll be dragged back there any second.”

“I went through that for a while,” Karen said. “These are strong people, though. I had to get myself out of the victim mindset. It was hard, but I’m mostly past it now.”

“Mostly?” Tex asked. “You’re strong. I’ve been so proud of you.”

“I know, sweetie, but I’ll be sitting here and suddenly I’m being raped by those monsters again. It’s like flashbacks. I come out of them fast, and it’s less and less often. You’re helping a lot with that.”

“I’m glad,” Tex said. “Here’s Green Valley Road.”

“How are the others that were with you?” Karen asked.

“Most are strong like me,” Samantha said. “A few had a really hard time, and I’m worried about them. The smallest of us has me worried the most. Her name is Kendall. She looks underage, but she’s not.”

“What happened to her?”

“She couldn’t control her body,” Samantha said. “She responded, even though she didn’t want to. The animals liked it so they used her more often, which made things even worse for her.”

“Oh, God,” Karen said, tears coming fast. “Lily.”

“Lily?”

“Don’t torture yourself, sweetie,” Tex said.

“What about Lily?” Samantha asked.

“Let’s just drop that one,” Tex said, shooting a worried glance at Karen. She made eye contact with him.

“It’s okay, Tex,” she said. “It’s better if I talk about it, frankly.” She turned to Samantha. “Lily responded like that, and got the same result from the captors. She shot herself as soon as she was alone with access to a gun.”

“Oh, no,” Samantha said. “I’m so sorry. Was she a close friend?”

“No, not really,” Karen said. “None of us knew each other, except for Morgan and Katie. We’re all thick as thieves now, of course.”

“All of us knew each other,” Samantha said. “That made it even worse in some ways.”

“Here comes Lotus road,” Tex said, looking relieved. “We’re almost there.”

“This conversation is bothering you, isn’t it?” Samantha asked.

“I have this huge problem with women being abused,” Tex said. “It makes my blood boil. I wish we were gonna kill some more of that trash tonight.”

Karen and Samantha shot each other a glance.

“You’re lucky to have him,” Samantha whispered. Karen looked her in the eye and shook her head yes.

“There’s our turn,” Tex said, watching Jules make the sharp right turn. “Hold on, little lady.”

Samantha grabbed the backs of the seats again as they turned.

“Wow, this looks like a quarry, doesn’t it?” Karen asked. “Or a mine.”

“Is that a big wall over there?” Samantha asked.

“Looks like an equipment compound,” Tex said. They slowed to a stop behind Jules’s rig as a massive gate slid to one side. “That wall is about fifteen feet tall.”

Jules drove forward slowly, Tex and the other coaches following, along with the first batch of off-roaders.

“Look, there’s spaces towards the back,” Karen said, watching Jules do a K-turn and back into the first one. “There’s a roof over them?”

Tex laughed. “Beautiful. We aren’t visible from the air here.” He followed Jules’s lead and made the K-turn, backing into the space next to Jules.

“Want me to get out and guide you?” Karen asked.

“Nah, little lady. The rear camera will do the job for me.”

“There’s hookups,” Karen said.

“Why would this be here?” Samantha asked.

“Probably to keep that earth-moving equipment over there out of the elements,” Tex said. He shut down the engine and got out of the driver’s seat, stretching his legs and extending a hand to Karen, who took it. He pulled her into an embrace. “I’ve been waiting to do that.”

“We’re here?” asked one of the three women in the back.

“Yes, Traci, we’re here,” Samantha said.

***

“We almost ready to go?” Garrett asked as he stepped through the front door of the house.

“We’re ready for the first trip,” Sam said. “We’ll need one more, but probably only with half as many vehicles.”

“What was the final tally that we lost?” Tyler asked.

Garrett looked at him, trying to hold back tears. “Forty-three.”

“Oh God,” Erica said.

“On the good side, we killed more than three hundred of them,” Garrett said.

“You still thinking about booby trapping this place?” Sam asked.

“Yeah, but not till we’re all safe and sound at Dodge City,” Garrett said. “I’ve got some guys working on the plan. It’ll probably happen at about two am tomorrow.”

“Okay, let’s saddle up,” Sam said in a loud voice.

“I’m sending a broadcast text,” Erica said.

Everybody rushed to their vehicles, which had been parked in a line on the way out the front gate, two of the battle wagons still outside of the gate to guard against problems.

“You riding with us, Garrett?” Sam asked.

“Yeah, with Anna, if you don’t mind.”

“I’d love it,” Erica said.

“It’s not a long trip, at least,” Sam said. “Let’s go.”

They left the house, walking across the veranda and getting into Sam’s rig, which was still parked right in front of the house. They loaded up – Sam, Mia, and Erica, Garrett and Anna, and six more tribe’s people. Sam fired up the engine and pulled away from the house, getting in line behind the other vehicles, more queueing up behind them. The caravan started moving.

“Here, you ride shotgun,” Erica said, looking at Garrett. “I’ll sit with Anna and the others.”

Garrett tipped his hat and got into the passenger seat.

“Sorry you lost so many folks,” Sam said, glancing at him as they moved towards Highway 94.

“The tribe lost five,” Garrett said. “From a percentage standpoint, that’s worse than what we suffered.”

“We need to recruit more people.”

“Yep, been thinking about that,” Garrett said. “There’s a lot of people still living out in the boonies here. Maybe we can bring them in.”

“We don’t even have to make space for them to live with us,” Sam said. “We just have to get them to show up at battles. That’s what the social media team has been doing in Texas. Ji-Ho told me about it earlier.”

“That’s what it’s gonna take,” Garrett said. “You believe what Ji-Ho was saying about the ratio of UN to Islamists heading more in favor of the Islamists?”

Sam thought silently for a moment. “I believe that’s what they were considering, but I think the damage we’ve inflicted, both here and up north, might either slow that down or stop it. I believe we do have them on the run. That’s why it’s so vital to shut down their remaining routes north from the Mexican border. If they can replenish men and equipment like they were doing before, we’ll have a hard time.”

“We’ll still win,” Garrett said. “You know that, right?”

“Why do you think that?”

“There are over forty million people in this state,” Garrett said. “Most of those people are on our side.”

“You think so?”

Garrett smiled. “I was listening to some of the younger guys while we were cleaning the scene. Social media is ablaze with talk of chasing the UN out of the state, and nobody wanted the Islamists here in the first place. The tide will turn, my friend, but we need to limit the game by blocking the enemy down here.”

“You sure most are on our side? I mean, look at the idiots that have held elective office here since the late 1970s.”

“Exposing the globalists as bringing in Islamists to bully the population has taken a lot of that support away,” Garrett said. “Add to that the video that Ivan did, with all of the women testifying about their experiences on the rape farms. Trust me, most people think that’s bad, regardless of if they’re on the right or on the left.”

They got to the Highway and sped up. “Checked the apps lately?” Sam asked.

Garrett lifted his cell phone up to his face. “I’ll do it now.”

They rode along silently for a few minutes, the road on either side becoming denser with structures as they neared Dulzura.

“Nobody close by,” Garrett said. “Still bad in Julian. Wonder where the slugs that hit us came from?”

“Probably Julian,” Sam said. “Wish we had some historical data we could look at.”

“Historical data?”

“Yeah, like enemy troop counts by area and by date,” Sam said.

“Oh,” Garrett said. “That would be a good thing. Maybe we ought to put some of the kids on it. Didn’t Seth have some experience with that sort of thing?”

“Yeah, come to think of it. I’ll talk to him when we get to Dodge City. After that last batch gets there, of course.”

“That will be faster than you think,” Garrett said. “One of my guys had a good idea. Rent trucks, and take them down there. We cleaned out the two rental places we have nearby. We ought to be seeing trucks go by any minute.”

“What about escorts?”

“We’re still using the 75 vehicles we have,” Garrett said. “They’ll drop off their load of souls and high-tail it back there. Look! There’s some of the rental trucks.”

Several large bobtail trucks raced by, honking their horns. Many of the caravan honked back at them.

“How about the cavalry? When will they make it back?”

“They should be getting close as we speak,” Garrett said. “I let them go a little earlier, and they’re riding as the crow flies. Makes some difference.”

“Good,” Sam said.

“Here’s the town,” Garrett said. “Still deadsville.”

“At least it didn’t get overrun like Julian and Descanso.”

“Don’t say that too loud,” Sam said. “Mia gets scared when Descanso is even mentioned.”

“Oh, sorry,” Garrett said. “I’ll keep that in mind. She’s a nice little girl.”

“She is,” Sam said.

“You guys want a soft drink or anything?” Erica asked.

“Not here,” Sam said. “Thanks.”

“We’ll be on the dirt road into Dodge City in less than ten minutes,” Garrett said. “It’ll get a little bouncy to drink soda.”

“Oh, didn’t think about that,” Erica said. “I’ll hold off.”

Garrett watched her walk back into the salon, then turned to Sam. “You two are gonna get hitched pretty soon, right?”

“I’m pushing for it,” Sam said. “Mia is helping my argument.”

“Erica doesn’t want that?”

“She does now, I think,” Sam said. “How about you?”

Garrett chuckled. “I’m pretty fond of Anna. Doubt I’ll be able to talk her into it, though. At least not near term. It’s too early in our relationship.”

Sam chuckled. “Yeah, I’ve known Erica a couple weeks longer than you’ve known Anna.”

Both men cracked up.

“What a crazy world we’re living in,” Garrett said. He lifted his phone back up and checked the apps.

“You see something?” Sam asked, watching Garrett’s expression change.

“Some hits coming south from Julian,” Garrett said.

“A lot of hits?”

“Thirty or so,” Garrett said. “Well spaced out. On Highway 79.”

“We’ll have to watch them,” Sam said. “Dammit. Hope we get time to prepare before we’re in the thick of it again.”

“They’re a long way away.”

“I know, Garrett, but we can’t see the UN guys.”

To be continued…

 

Bug Out! Texas 9 – Patriots Unleashed has just been published, and is now available in the Kindle Store, free in Kindle Unlimited!

 

Bug Out! California Book 2 – Resistance has just been published, and is now available in the Kindle Store, free in Kindle Unlimited!

 

Bug Out! California Book 1 is now available in the Kindle Store, free in Kindle Unlimited!

 

Bug Out! Texas Book 8 – West Border Mayhem is now available in the Kindle Store, free in Kindle Unlimited!

 

The Plan – How the Bugout! War Started is now available in the Kindle Store, free in Kindle Unlimited!

 

Bug Out! Texas Book 7 – Flood of Patriots – next in the series is now available in the Kindle store, free in Kindle Unlimited!

 

Bug Out! Texas Book 6 – Citizen Vengeance – next in the series is now available in the Kindle store, free in Kindle Unlimited!

 

Bug Out! Texas Book 5 – Wave of Patriots – next in the series is now available in the Kindle store, free in Kindle Unlimited!

 

Horror Road Book 4 – the latest in the series is now available in the Kindle store!

 

Bug Out! Texas Book 4 – Texas Battle Cry is now available in the Kindle store!

 

Bug Out! Texas Book 3 – Republic in Peril is now available in the Kindle store!

 

Bug Out! Texas Book 2 – The New Republic is now available in the Kindle Store. Pick up your copy of this exciting thriller today!

 

Bug Out! Texas has just been published in the Kindle Store! This is the story of Texas Patriots and their struggle against enemies, foreign and domestic, during the Bug Out! War. Chock full of action, adventure, suspense, and romance. Pick up your copy of Bug Out! Texas Book 1 today!

 

Please visit and like my author page on Facebook!

 

Here’s the series that started it all! Bug Out! Pick up your copy of book 1 for just 99 cents in the Kindle Store!

 

Horror Road – A Supernatural Thriller! Available now in the Kindle Store

 

The first of my full length novels has been published in the Amazon Kindle store, available now. For those of you have have been readying the Bugout! series, the story involves George and Malcolm, and is set about seven years earlier. This book R rated, instead of the PG-13 of the Bugout! Series, so be warned. Here’s the link to “Never A Loose End”

 

 

Copyright Robert Boren 2017

Bugout! California Part 129 – Deadly Battle

Sam followed the caravan, heading back to the Williams place. They could hear gunfire as they made the left onto Dutchman Canyon Road.

“This is bad,” Erica said. “Hear all that?”

“Yeah,” Sam said. “The driveway’s blocked. Broken Gaz Tigrs. We’ll have to push them out of the way.”

“Somebody better stay here to blast any more that come down the road,” Clem said.

“I’m texting Angel,” Yvonne said. “They’re the last. They should pull up next to the driveway and go into siege mode.”

“Do that,” Sam said as he made the final turn into the driveway, watching Seth’s rig raise the front armor plate and move forward.

“He’s gonna do what we did at the winery,” Erica said, watching as the massive rig pushed the first Gaz Tigr out of the way. Sam squeezed their rig past and pushed the second one out of the way, then opened fire right away.

“Geez, look at all those UN Peacekeepers,” Sam said.

“Son of a bitch, we got here just in time,” Garrett said, texting to the 75 cars full of cowboys, who had gone around the gate and were rolling in from both sides of the property.

“Move up, dammit,” Sam said as he pulled forward. He heard a mini gun go off behind them, turning his sight to see Angel’s coach firing at a Gaz Tigr on Highway 94. Another was behind it. Sam swung his guns around and fired with Angel, both Tigrs exploding into flames. “Dammit, maybe we’d better stay here.”

“Our little girl is in there,” she said. “Get this beast in, then I’m going into the house.”

“Okay,” Sam said, driving forward through the gate, going past Seth and Trevor’s rigs as they fired at the fleeing UN Peacekeepers. Cowboys rushed in on foot and fired at them too.

“Make a sweeping turn and pull into the veranda,” Erica shouted. “I want the door facing the house.”

“Way ahead of you, sweetie,” Sam said calmly, turning the vehicle and parking, blocking the veranda, then going into siege mode. Garrett opened the slit on the driver’s side and stuck an M60 through, mowing down a group of UN Peacekeepers who were hiding behind some cover firing at the cowboys.

“Nice shooting,” Clem said, getting next to him. Sid and Yvonne had their guns out and headed towards the door.

“You sure you want to be doing that?” Sam asked.

“Let them go,” Garrett said. “Our women and children are in there. We need some M60s in the house.”

“Okay, but somebody stay here to reload and man the slits,” Sam said.

“I’ll stay,” Clem said. “I’m too slow to run around anyway.”

“I’ll stay here too,” Sid said, glancing at Yvonne.

“Okay, honey, I’m going with Erica,” she said.

“I’m going too,” Garett said. “Mind if I take this M60?”

“Go,” Sam said. “We’ve got plenty, plus the BAR is in the back too.”

Garrett nodded and followed the others out, rushing over the veranda, pockmarked with bullet holes, bursting through the door. Anna was at the stairs up from the basement with her Winchester, relieved when she saw Garrett and Erica rushing there.

“Where’s Mia?” Erica asked as the gunfire surged.

“In the basement with the other women and children,” she said. “Glad you guys made it. We were on our way to losing.”

“Yeah, well it ain’t over yet,” Garrett shouted, tipping his hat to Anna and then rushing to a window on the front corner of the house. He opened the window and fired at a group of Islamists trying to sneak towards the house, killing most of them and alerting some of the cavalry, who rushed over and killed the rest before they could retreat.

“Somebody get in the back of the house,” Garrett shouted. “We’re liable to be attacked from there.”

“About twenty of the cars your guys came in are back there now,” Anna shouted.

Back in the rig, Sam was wailing away with the grenade launcher at yet another group of Islamists and UN Peacekeepers, who were rushing towards Seth’s rig. Then a group of the cowboys got on the cannons, turning them, loading in a panic as Sid and Clem opened up with M60s. The ear-shattering boom of the cannons went off, one after the other, shattering three Gaz Tigrs which had tried to come in from the west side of the property.

Sam laughed. “The trees were too dense for them to get out of there, and they couldn’t get turned around quick enough.”

“Damn straight, baby,” Clem shouted. “There’s two more behind them, but they’re going towards the driveway, see?”

“The cannon team sees them too,” Sid said, watching them load new cannon balls and ram them in. They fired, hitting both Tigrs, one of them rolling over, the other stopping, men trying to get out. Clem and Sid saw them and opened fire along with several of the cowboys.

“They had a whole lot more fighters than I expected,” Sam said, looking from one point to another, firing short blips with the mini gun and firing grenades. “Hope this is all.”

“They have to get past those two battle wagons in the driveway,” Clem said. “Look, the cannons are being moved again, in the other direction!”

“Dammit,” Sam shouted as a volley of machine gun fire killed several of the cannon crew. He spun the mini gun around and opened fire, hitting fleeing Islamists as more cowboys rushed up to take over at the cannons, loading and firing again, spewing fire and smoke.

“This stuff is burning my eyes,” Clem shouted, turning to smile at Sam.

“It’s slowing down,” Sid said. “Finally.”

The cavalry showed themselves again, riding from place to place, swords out, slashing survivors as the gunfire ended.

Garrett was on the veranda now, looking around. Anna ran out and hugged him, and they went back into the house.

“I think it’s over,” Sam said, looking at his phone. “I don’t see anybody else coming. At least no Islamists.”

“That was a hell of a battle,” Sid said. “Look at all the bodies. My God.”

“Clean up on aisle nine,” Clem said.

“Somebody man the main sight, while I go inside,” Sam said. “I want to make sure Erica and Mia are okay.”

“I’ll take the sight,” Sid said. “Getting pretty good with these things.”

“Better reload the mini gun,” Sam said as he left, stepping out of the coach. He rushed to the open door, covered with bullet holes. “Erica!”

“Down here,” he heard Erica shout back, muffled from the basement. He sprinted to the stairs, nodding to Anna and Garrett as they were embraced in the kitchen.

“Daddy!” Mia shouted, rushing from Erica’s arms to his.

***

Ed sighed, leaning back in the passenger seat, pushing the main sight away. Ryan backed away from the side windows, pulling his M60 out of the gun slit and leaning it against the wall.

“Should we go out?” Ryan asked.

“Let’s load up the guns again first,” Ed said, getting out of his seat. They got to the task, Ryan doing the mini gun, Ed the M19.

“We almost got overrun, didn’t we?” Ryan asked as he walked back into the salon.

Ed closed and latched the M19 compartment, then looked at him. “We did. This place has too many entrance points. We’ve either got to fortify it more or get the hell out of here.”

“Ji-Ho is getting out,” Ryan said, looking out the window. Shall we?”

“Might as well,” he said. “Take a weapon.”

“You think they’ll be back?”

“No, but I didn’t think they’d throw more at us than we can handle, either,” he said.

Ryan shrugged and grabbed one of the M-16s, handing it to Ed, then picking up one for himself. “I don’t want to haul an M60 around. Arm’s still bothering me.”

“This will be okay,” Ed said. They left the coach and walked over to Ji-Ho, who was about to climb the veranda steps with Sarah. He turned towards them.

“We lucky,” Ji-Ho said, lines in his face making him look tired and old.

“I believe the same,” Ed said. “We need to discuss.”

“Yes,” Ji-Ho said.

“I’m gonna go find Yvonne,” Sarah said, moving quickly up the stairs.

“Sarah,” Ji-Ho said. She stopped and looked back at him. “You were good.”

She smiled. “Yeah, I was, wasn’t I? You weren’t half bad yourself.”

Ji-Ho chuckled. “Yes, for old guy.”

“Sam out of his coach?” Ed asked, looking at it parked next to the veranda steps. The door opened, Sid poking his head out.

“Okay to come out now, I take it.” He came down the steps.

“I’ll stick around and man the guns, just in case,” Clem said from inside.

“Okay,” Sid said. “I’m gonna find Yvonne.”

The men walked up the steps, just as Sam was coming out the front door.

“Oh, good, there you are,” Ed said. “We need to chat.”

“Yes, we do,” Sam said. “That was bad. We barely won.”

“Yes, we barely win, but we do win,” Ji-Ho said. “Don’t get discouraged, but we must learn and adjust.”

Garrett came out of the kitchen with Anna. “Gentlemen, you all made it unharmed.” His expression was grim.

“Lost a fair number of your men,” Ed said.

“I know,” Garrett said. “We need to chat. We can’t afford another day like today.’

“No, we can’t,” Sam said. “Living room?”

“Yes,” Ji-Ho said. They walked into the large room to the left of the door and found seats on the couches.

“How many warriors did we lose?” Ryan asked, “and where’s Tyler?”

“I’m here,” Tyler said as he approached from the door. “I was in the coach with Seth and Kaitlyn.”

“They still in there?” Sam asked.

“Yeah,” Tyler said. “Angel and Megan are still in their’s, and Trevor and Kaylee too.”

“Good,” Sam said. “They know to stay and keep watch for a while?”

“Yes, we chatted before I left,” Tyler said. “That was a cluster..”

“Stop!” Erica said as she brought Mia over.

“Sorry,” Tyler said.

“What we’re gonna discuss might scare Mia,” Anna said.

“No!” Mia said quickly. “I want to stay with daddy.”

“We can handle it in a good way, if everybody’s careful,” Erica said. “If it gets bad, I’ll take her elsewhere.”

“Okay, back too it,” Ryan said. “Do we know how many warriors we lost?”

“Your people?” Garrett asked.

Ryan smiled. “No, all groups. I consider all of us warriors.”

“I’ll drink to that,” Sam said.

Garrett pulled out his phone and sent a text. “I just asked my men to start working that. They’ve got to pick up the battlefield anyway.”

“Are we sure that Dodge City is okay?” Ed asked.

Garrett hit send on the text and then looked up at him. “It’s easier to defend, and I’ve got mounted patrols going 24/7. They’re okay so far. I’ve been in contact almost constantly. Even considered bringing some more cavalry over here. Would’ve if the tide didn’t turn.”

“Okay, let’s cut to the chase,” Sam said. “The way I see it, we have three choices. Fortify this place, move everybody to Dodge City, or leave the city and fight from the road.”

“We have too many young and old to fight from the road,” Ryan said.

“Our people did that for centuries,” Ed said, “but war was different then.”

“Frankly, there’s too many young and old at Dodge City to do that, too, and supply lines to feed everybody would be a problem. We have livestock and even some farming at Dodge City.”

“Sounds like fighting from the road can be eliminated,” Ryan said. Several others nodded in agreement, but Sam held up his hands.

“Nothing gets eliminated yet,” he said. “I had a similar choice when we were still in the RV park. Had I chosen to stay and fortify, we’d be dead now.”

“That was smaller and harder to defend,” Sid said.

“That’s true,” Sam said. “How did the enemy force get into Dodge City last night?”

“Four-wheel drive vehicles and on foot,” Garrett said, “best that we could tell, anyway. They did it slowly. Probably were hanging out there when we were at the winery.”

“That was diversion only,” Ji-Ho said.

“Yes, I tend to agree with that,” Garrett said.

“Why?” Sam asked.

“We only found thirty dead UN Peacekeepers,” Garrett said.

“Think some might have escaped after they were losing the battle?” Sid asked.

“No,” Garrett said. “They would’ve left tracks. We’ve been all over it today. We got them all.”

“So, the plan was always to hit us here?” Ryan asked.

“As a first step, yes,” Tyler said. “They’ve scoped out both. I’m sure they thought this was a target they could take out.”

“Yes, weakening us in the process,” Erica said. “Then they would’ve hit us in Dodge City again with larger numbers.”

“They still might,” Sam said. “We don’t know how many UN Peacekeepers there are around here.”

“We don’t know that, but we know something else,” Ed said.

“What’s that?” Sam asked.

“We know that we’re a huge priority for them.”

“Revenge?” Ryan asked.

“No,” Ji-Ho said. “They need routes back. I-8, mostly. We can stop that, and they know. Not personal.”

“Oh, there may be some personal,” Sam said. “I know Saladin and I’ve read a lot about Daan Mertins. We’re on their last nerve. Trust me.”

“Yeah, I think you’re right about that,” Sid said.

“Me too,” Ed said. “Is there a way to fortify this location?”

“No,” Tyler said.

“Why not?” Sid asked.

“It’s not miles away from the highway like Dodge City. It’s a couple hundred yards. They could line up mortars on Highway 94 and destroy this place before we could stop them.”

“What about the battle wagons?” Ryan asked.

“If they fire mortars from road, we can stop. If they go out into desert floor a few hundred yards, they can still hit, and we can’t follow with these massive rigs.”

“The grenade launchers and the mini guns have some range,” Ryan said.

“We’ll run out of ammo,” Sam said. “Before we can get re-stocked. Hell, there’s only two belts of .50 cal left in my rig, and I didn’t use my mini gun as much as some of the others.”

“Sounds to me like our choice is obvious,” Garrett said.

Everybody sat silently for a few moments. Erica was watching Sam, his brow furrowed, hand rubbing his chin. “Spit it out, honey.”

He looked up at her and sighed, pausing to caress Mia’s hair for a moment. “All it’s gonna take is some artillery or a few tanks and we’ll be at a large disadvantage.”

“That’s why you don’t want to give up being on the road as an option?” Erica asked.

“Yeah,” Sam said, “and I didn’t mean that we stay on the road – what I meant is that we move around from one place to another instead of settling down and digging in. I’ll go with what the group decides, but I think we should be ready to skedaddle in a hurry regardless of where our base is or how well we think it’s fortified.”

“Are there back ways out of Dodge City?” Ed asked. “Realistic routes that we could all escape on?”

Garrett thought about it for a moment. “Yes, there are, in several directions, but they all lead into very many miles of wilderness. Tough wilderness, with no water for long stretches.”

“So maybe we use what we’ve learned over the years,” Tyler said. “Prepare ahead of time. Stash water, food, and even ammo at various points.”

“Clem can do a lot with sensors and cameras, too,” Sid said.

“Yeah, he’s right about that,” Sam said. “We’ve got quite a few claymore mines left over from a couple previous battles. They could help us on the roads into Dodge City.”

Garrett laughed. “Well, if you want to make booby traps, we’ve got a lot of dynamite too, and we can manufacture a lot more. We could make that place a terror to enter, that’s for sure.”

“As long as we don’t blow ourselves up in the process of protecting ourselves,” Sid said.

“Is there anyone who thinks we should stay here and fortify?” Erica asked.

Nobody raised their hands.

“Are we really ready to make the decision so fast?” Anna asked.

“It’s going to be dark in a few hours,” Erica said. “Do we want to spend the night here?”

“She have point,” Ji-Ho said. “The longer we sit around and chat, the more time enemy has to take advantage.”

“Could we even get everybody over there tonight?” Erica asked. “Do we have enough vehicles?”

“It’ll take more than one trip,” Ed said. “Probably as many as three, and that’s with loading the battle wagons to the gills.”

“Remember we’re down one of those, too,” Sid said. “Lost one at the winery, remember?”

Garrett smiled. “No, towed it to Dodge City. We’ll have a new transaxle in a couple of days. The rest of it is fine.”

“Nice,” Sid said, smiling.

“We also get resupply, just so you know,” Ji-Ho said. “I already send request to Ivan.”

“He’s got more stuff?” Erica asked.

“Yes,” Ji-Ho said. “Including new toys used up north. See.” He held up his phone, showing a picture of an off-roader with a turret on top.

Sam burst out laughing. “That’s a grenade launcher, same model as we’re using on the battle wagons.”

“Yes, but look at gimbal and sight mechanism.”

“Where does he get this stuff?” Sam asked.

“Team in Texas developed off-roaders,” Ji-Ho said. “Your old friend gave him the idea for the battle wagons.”

“My old friend?”

“George Franklin,” Ji-Ho said. “Remember Red Dagger’s family?”

Sam chuckled. “I’m almost afraid to hear about this.”

“Careful, Mia’s right here,” Erica said.

“Not graphic tale,” Ji-Ho said. “Red family developed vehicle, teamed briefly with George and Malcom, take out Sailor Boy with help of prototype.”

“Who’s Red Dagger?” Tyler asked.

“Later,” Sam said.

“Okay, let’s start working logistics on the move,” Garrett said.

“What about the bodies?” Anna whispered to him.

“Our fallen go with us. The rest can rot here, as far as I’m concerned.”

“Lots of them have chips,” Sid said. “That’ll be a draw. Maybe we ought to booby trap the joint on the way out.”

Garrett chuckled, then pulled out his phone and sent a text.

“What’d you do?” Sid asked.

“We’ll have about a hundred pounds of TNT here by nightfall.”

To be continued…

 

Bug Out! Texas 9 – Patriots Unleashed has just been published, and is now available in the Kindle Store, free in Kindle Unlimited!

 

Bug Out! California Book 2 – Resistance has just been published, and is now available in the Kindle Store, free in Kindle Unlimited!

 

Bug Out! California Book 1 is now available in the Kindle Store, free in Kindle Unlimited!

 

Bug Out! Texas Book 8 – West Border Mayhem is now available in the Kindle Store, free in Kindle Unlimited!

 

The Plan – How the Bugout! War Started is now available in the Kindle Store, free in Kindle Unlimited!

 

Bug Out! Texas Book 7 – Flood of Patriots – next in the series is now available in the Kindle store, free in Kindle Unlimited!

 

Bug Out! Texas Book 6 – Citizen Vengeance – next in the series is now available in the Kindle store, free in Kindle Unlimited!

 

Bug Out! Texas Book 5 – Wave of Patriots – next in the series is now available in the Kindle store, free in Kindle Unlimited!

 

Horror Road Book 4 – the latest in the series is now available in the Kindle store!

 

Bug Out! Texas Book 4 – Texas Battle Cry is now available in the Kindle store!

 

Bug Out! Texas Book 3 – Republic in Peril is now available in the Kindle store!

 

Bug Out! Texas Book 2 – The New Republic is now available in the Kindle Store. Pick up your copy of this exciting thriller today!

 

Bug Out! Texas has just been published in the Kindle Store! This is the story of Texas Patriots and their struggle against enemies, foreign and domestic, during the Bug Out! War. Chock full of action, adventure, suspense, and romance. Pick up your copy of Bug Out! Texas Book 1 today!

 

Please visit and like my author page on Facebook!

 

Here’s the series that started it all! Bug Out! Pick up your copy of book 1 for just 99 cents in the Kindle Store!

 

Horror Road – A Supernatural Thriller! Available now in the Kindle Store

 

The first of my full length novels has been published in the Amazon Kindle store, available now. For those of you have have been readying the Bugout! series, the story involves George and Malcolm, and is set about seven years earlier. This book R rated, instead of the PG-13 of the Bugout! Series, so be warned. Here’s the link to “Never A Loose End”

 

 

Copyright Robert Boren 2017